LOWER DIVISION COURSES IN ENGLISH
Please note that these courses do NOT fulfill any requirements for the major in
English or American Literature & Culture or the English minor.

English 19.1                                      Creative Writing: Identity, Politics, Desire, Death, and Empathy
                                            Fiat Lux         
                       Prof. Torres


Thematically structured study. Each week students read one or two very short pieces (flash fiction, prose poems, one-act plays, etc.) on given theme, then are prompted to create their own pieces in response. Discussions are lively, expansive, and wandering; but when it comes to writing, focus on precision and concision. How much can be said in one page or less?

English 19.2                                     What a Poem Says: Three Fundamental Modes of Poetry
                                  
Fiat Lux
Prof. Kessler

Each student selects poem from anthology (of about 100 poems in varied basic modes of poetry) as exemplar of mode or mixed mode, reads poem aloud, and writes one- to two-page paper detailing what poem says--not what it is thought to mean--and opens class discussion of what mode of thought, emotion, or experience it expresses. Class meets on October 6, 20, November 3, 17, and December 1 in A66 Humanities Building.

English 19.3                                  Prison and Literary Production
                                 
Fiat Lux
Prof. Thomas

What have prisons got to do with poetry or prose? How does prison--both as legal institution and literary concept--serve as site for production of texts that belong to our literary canons? How do prison narratives help us think through, or re-think, great themes in literature (freedom, death, human rights, liberty, justice, etc.)? More specifically, how does place of confinement enable and even inform literary composition? Addressing such questions, exploration of different genres of prison writing (epistle, diary, autobiography, testament, elegy), drawn primarily from medieval and early modern literary canon and secondarily from more recent prison literature. Readings range from early 3rd-century prison diary of martyr Perpetua, 6th-century Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy, and 16th-century Thomas More's Dialogue on Conscience, to more recent De Profundis of Oscar Wilde and The Guantanamo Diary of Mohamedou ould Slahi.

English 20                                  Introduction to Creative Writing  Prof. D'Aguiar &
Prof. Simpson

Preparation: submission of creative or expository writing samples to screening committee. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 20W. Designed to introduce fundamentals of creative writing. Emphasis either on poetry, fiction, or drama, depending on wishes of instructor(s) during any given term. Readings from assigned texts and weekly writing assignments required.

English M50                                Introduction to Visual Culture
Prof. McHugh

Study of how visual media, including advertising, still and moving images, and narrative films, influence contemporary aesthetics, politics, and knowledge.

English 85                               American Novel Prof. Mott

Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for any courses in 170 series. Development, with emphasis on form, of American novel from its beginning to present day. Includes works of such novelists as Hawthorne, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Ellison, and Morrison.

English 88A                              Medieval Literature
                            Lower Division Seminars: Special Topics in English
Prof. Fisher

"Medieval Outlaws, Rebels, and Rioters"

This class will investigate the medieval poetry and prose that invented outlaws, rebels, and rioters in England. From outlawry's most famous son, Robin Hood, to lesser-known rebels such as Fouke fitz Waryn and Hereward the Wake, this class will consider what it means to be out of the law, to be labelled a rebel, or to be found responsible for riot. We'll follow the ways in which outlaws were constructed as social, political, legal, and economic transgressors, and how those in power responded. Primary texts in Middle English and Modern English translation. Secondary texts will include historical, legal, and theoretical readings. Extensive class participation is essential, all students will give in-class presentations and write a substantial research-based seminar paper.

English 88J                            20th-Century American Literature
                            Lower Division Seminars: Special Topics in English
Prof. Charles

"Up Close and Personal: Short Prose Forms in Twentieth Century America"

This course serves as an introduction to twentieth-century American literature by focusing on short prose forms, including the short story, lyric essay, and memoir. Particular emphasis on the work of women writers. We will read major authors including Zora Neale Hurston, Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, and Toni Morrison. Our dual focus will be on the aesthetic rigor of brevity and on its emotional effects.

English 90                            Shakespeare Prof. Watson

Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare's plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare's breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement.

English 91C                            Introduction to Fiction Prof. North

Introduction to prose narrative, its techniques and forms. Analysis of short and long narratives and of critical issues such as plot, characterization, setting, narrative voice, realistic and nonrealistic forms.

English 97H                           Honors Seminar for Freshmen and Sophomores
Prof. Kareem


This course introduces students to the craft of research as practiced by students and scholars of literature. Starting with the premise that research consists of three fundamental aspects — searching, reading, and writing — we will consider questions that we must ask ourselves as we undertake these activities. These questions range from the practical—how do we use library databases? What do we look for when we read scholarly articles? Why do we need bibliographies? —to the theoretical—what determines whether an argument is interesting? How do we decide in what order to organize our thoughts? Why do we prefer one theoretical framework over another?

WRITING INTENSIVE COURSES

English 110B.1       Writing in the English Major: Adjunct Prof. Lewak


Writing in the English Major: Adjunct is a 2-unit course attached to an upper division lecture course offered in the English department. It is supervised separately from this lecture course and provides instruction in writing separate from, but in support of, the objectives of the course to which it is linked (as university regulations prohibit students from submitting the same work for credit in different classes). In addition, as an independent writing class, English 110B is neither an introduction to literature course, nor is it a basic skills composition course. It is designed to help students in the English major enhance their critical thinking and writing skills with regard to literary analyses. Writing is a process, and good writing is the result of creating, revising, pondering, cutting, and seeking reactions. Students should expect to write and to rewrite as they deepen their understanding of literary interpretation and argument.

THIS 2-UNIT ADJUNCT COURSE IS ONLY OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO ARE ALSO ENROLLED IN ENGLISH M107A FOR FALL 2016.

English 110B.2        Writing in the English Major: Adjunct Prof. Gottlieb
 
THIS 2-UNIT ADJUNCT COURSE IS ONLY OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO ARE ALSO ENROLLED IN ENGLISH 150A FOR FALL 2016.

English 110T              Writing in the English Major
Prof. Cunningham


Wondering what the English department at UCLA considers top-notch writing? Hoping to do your best writing while at UCLA? English 110T: "Writing in the English Major" provides instruction in critical writing about literature and culture for English and American Literature and Culture major transfer students at UCLA. Designed to help with the "transfer transition," its goal is to help students improve their skills at literary and cultural analysis. It's a workshop for discovering richer literary questions, developing more substantive analyses of complex texts, and finding an authoritative voice. The course assumes writing is a process, so students write, rewrite, and workshop writing assignments. Requirements include regular readings, short writing tasks, and a final paper. Grades are based 50% on the final paper (including prewriting and drafts), and 50% on other written assignments and participation. "Writing in the English Major" qualifies as an elective for the major. To enroll, see Janel Munguia or Danielle Maris in the English Department Undergraduate Counseling offices; they'll verify that you're a transfer student and enroll you in the course.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH BEFORE 1500

English 140A Chaucer: Canterbury Tales              
Prof. McNamara

Introductory study of Chaucer's language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, Canterbury Tales.

English 145            The Virgin, the Wife, and the Widow:       
Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women         
Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent        
Prof. Thomas

The category of the holy life offers a space for thinking through the relationship between the church and holy women, between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, between rebellion and conformity. Ranging from the lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides and chaste wives, we will focus on the ways in which the holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow shaped norms of medieval Church by rebelling against and at same time conforming to them. We will close read the lives of such women (and a few holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues from virginity to marriage, from travel to enclosure. Questions for discussion include: Why did holy women come to play increasingly dominant roles in the Middle Ages? What were ways in which they used their virginity or chastity to find agency within ecclesiastical norms designed to control their lives?

NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ENGLISH 142 WITH THE SAME TITLE IN SPRING OR FALL, 2014, WITH PROFESSOR THOMAS.

 English 149

Arthurian Literature      
Medievalisms     

Prof. Moyer

In a literary "Medievalisms" course, our goal is not only to learn about medieval texts, but also to examine how later cultures conceptualize and use those same texts. We will study how and why people of later time periods have called upon medieval stories and tropes to create their own art or amplify their own ideas. To make this vast topic more manageable, we'll focus specifically on the legend of King Arthur, a universe of stories and characters that's over a thousand years old and still going strong. We'll become familiar with major English medieval Arthurian texts as well as a variety of later incarnations of the story. Expect to spend a substantial amount of time reading significant sections of Thomas Malory's 15th-century book Le Morte Darthur as well as T. H. White's 20th-century novel The Once and Future King. We'll also read shorter excerpts of many other works (such as medieval romances and Twain's Connecticut Yankee), and, obviously, no Arthurian course is truly complete without Monty Python and the Holy Grail. By examining all these diverse texts together, we'll gain insight into why this ancient legend has never lost its immense power.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH 1500-1700

English M103              Shakespearean Disability Studies
             Studies in Disability Literatures
Prof. Gottlieb

What happens when we look at Shakespeare's plays through the lenses provided by disability studies? Shakespeare's plays are full of characters with disabilities, but these representations have only recently begun to receive critical attention. This course will introduce you to disability studies and Shakespeare studies by exploring the dynamic points of contact between the two.

We will consider how physical and mental differences are marked in texts and performed on stage and in film. We will examine the construction of dis/ability in relation to constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Through analyzing representations of disability in Shakespeare's time and in our own, you will be introduced to the history of disability and will become familiar with major concepts in disability studies.

English 133                       Transatlantic Fictions (1500-1700)
                     
Transatlantic Literatures and Cultures
Prof. Fuchs

This course explores how early modern Europe digests and assimilates the New World, with a special emphasis on English texts. The course considers the genres of encounter and colonization—-letters, travel narratives, chronicles, utopias-—and the transformation of those genres by later English authors. How do problems of quotation, translation, and certification shape European visions of the Americas? How do literary strategies relate to imperial goals? We will address the relation between desire and conquest; the contrasts between Renaissance conceptions of the New World and first-person, experiential accounts, and the role of language in the American exchanges. We will compare imaginative and historiographical accounts, focusing on how texts deal with problems of truth and authority in representation. In short, we will learn how to read highly self-conscious texts for their rhetorical and ideological goals, exploring how the broad category of the transatlantic enables investigation beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries. In our writing and class assignments, we will focus on how to make arguments about literary and historical texts, and how to think critically about the transatlantic encounter.

English 150A                            Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Prof. McEachern


Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet.

Students taking this course are strongly encouraged to enroll in the associated 2-unit adjunct course, English 110B.2, for fall quarter, 2016, with C. Gottlieb (R 4-5:50pm). English 110B represents an addition to the English curriculum which provides students an opportunity to strengthen their writing skills while accruing additional units to meet graduation requirements in a more timely manner. Students who complete 2 separate sections of English 110B as majors in American Literature & Culture or English will be permitted to pair them to satisfy one elective requirement for their major.

English 150C                           Shakespearean Tragicomedy
                        
Topics in Shakespeare
    Prof. Braunmuller


From the start of his career, Shakespeare's plays displayed a blending of tone and a mixture of emotions that make them very attractive but also puzzling and difficult to categorize (and hence difficult to evaluate). This course considers some of his most generically puzzling plays -- from Comedy of Errors to Winter's Tale and The Tempest with stops at Measure for Measure, Pericles, Romeo and Juliet, and others. We will explore generic theory a little but the emphasis will be on the plays as theatre. One prospectus and a research paper of 12-15pp and significant classroom contributions required. Previous experience of Shakespeare's works -- or those of his contemporaries -- on page or stage strongly advised.

English 151                          Milton
    Prof. Shuger


Milton is the last Renaissance poet; his poetry, the culmination of the rebirth of Antiquity, both Classical and Christian, that began in Italy some three centuries earlier. Yet, if heir to the ancient traditions, Milton is also harbinger of what the dollar bill (look in your wallet) calls Novus Ordo Seculorum, the New Order of the Ages. Of the perhaps sixty paintings that encircle the walls of the New York Public Library's reference room, hung in chronological order to compose a visual narrative of American history, two (the second and third) are of Milton. . . The course will focus on the major poetry, especially Paradise Lost, but since Milton was a political thinker and a fairly important figure in the English Revolution, we will also read some of the key prose tracts, including his seminal defense of a free press. There will be two papers and ten quizzes, but neither midterm nor final.

English 166A                          Colonial Beginnings of American Literature Prof. Colacurcio


Historical survey of American literatures of discovery and exploration, contact, and settlement, with emphasis on genres that express distinctive colonial identities, myths, and religious visions.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH 1700-1850

English 162B
                       Later Romantic Literature        
Prof. Nersessian

"The decline from thinking to feeling" is how a character in Tom Stoppard's play, Arcadia, describes the transition from the eighteenth century to the Romantic period (1790-1830). In this course, we ask how the second generation of Romantics felt and thought about their place in history: was the world indeed in "decline," or even hurtling rapidly toward its end? Or could things change for the better? We will track these questions across literary and political domains, alongside issues of industrialization and urbanization, imperialism, the rise of popular social movements (feminism, abolitionism, socialism), technological innovation, and environmental degradation. Readings include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and William Hazlitt's experimental novel Liber Amoris; poetry by Byron, Shelley, Keats, and Clare; and a selection of non-fiction prose. We will also spend considerable time with works of visual art, especially John Constable's famous cloud paintings.

English 163C                Jane Austen and Her Peers Prof. Charles

"Jane Austen in Context"

Intensive study of Jane Austen's six complete novels, along with select juvenilia, literature written by her contemporaries, and her ongoing fan culture. We will focus both on Austen's formal innovations and on the historical problems that she engaged, including slavery and women's rights.

English 165A                Imperial Culture, 1700-1850 Prof. Hollander

With readings including Arabian Nights Entertainments, A Modest Proposal, and the Turkish Embassy Letters, this course will examine imperialism and transnationalism throughout the eighteenth century and into the nineteenth. Topics will include slavery and commodity culture, emerging technologies, intersections of gender and race, otherness, Orientalism, and nationalist projects. Other readings are Alexander Pope's Windsor-Forest, the epistolary exchanges between Ignatius Sancho and Samuel Johnson, as well as pertinent historical documents and print media.

English 167A                American Poetry to 1900 Prof. Reed

Walt Whitman has mixed feelings about you taking this class. On one hand, he has assumed American Poetry to 1900, and so, he believes, can you. On the other, in a late-life essay Whitman reflects: "real representative National Literature formates itself (like language, or 'the weather') not from two or three influences, however important, nor indeed from any learned syllabus, or criticism, or what ought to be, nor from any minds or advice of toploftical quarters, but slowly, slowly, curiously, from many more and more, deeper mixings and siftings (especially in America) and generations and years and races, and what largely appears to be chance—but is not chance at all."

Though Whitman is conflicted about the kind of knowledge that a learned syllabus can produce, to me the case is clearer. If you survived Whitman's sentence, certainly if you suspect you liked it, in spite or because of its knots, then this course is for you. The course examines the long foreground for the styles, urges, conflicts, displacements, and ambitions displayed so boldly in Whitman's 1891 pronouncement. Beginning with the Puritan traditions of elegy and meditation (Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor), the syllabus traces the kinds of "mixings and siftings" that poetic forms make possible in America, including the formal feelings of Phillis Wheatley, the imposing decorum of the Fireside Poets, radical symbolisms from Edgar Poe, Henry David Thoreau, and Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt, the "highly wrought style" for which an ensemble of women writers were regarded in their day, those lovely, vexing lyrics of Emily Dickinson, and Paul Laurence Dunbar's dialect accomplishment. If these schools and poets, and some others we cover, have relations with one another that appear not to be chance, the course leaves it to you to exfoliate them in brief weekly responses, a recitation, and two essays.

English 168                 Major American Writers Prof. Pierson

Broad survey of representative American writers across several centuries, designed to give concise account of broad narrative of American literary development, from origins through 19th century. Includes mainly works that have traditionally been identified as American classics and asks both what makes American literature distinctive and what its relations are to other literatures in English.

DOES NOT SATISFY ANY REQUIREMENT FOR AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE MAJORS (OTHER THAN "ENGLISH ELECTIVE").

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH 1850-PRESENT

English M101B                      Pre-Stonewall LGBT/Queer Literature since 1855
                   Queer Literatures and Cultures, 1850-1970
Prof. Little

Surveys or focuses on discrete period of queer literature and culture from c. 1850 to 1970. Works by such writers as Walt Whitman, Radclyffe Hall, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Langston Hughes, Tennessee Williams, Henry Blake Fuller, and James Baldwin are some of the possible candidates of study.

English M104A                   Early African American Literature
Prof. Yarborough

Survey of African American literature from the 18th century to World War I, including oral and written forms (folktales, spirituals, sermons; fiction, poetry, essays). Authors covered include Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Charles Chesnutt, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The class will focus both on the historical and cultural contexts for the literary works and also on strategies for engaging formal aspects of the assigned materials.

English M105E
                   Queering Latino Literature:
                   From Machismo to Feminism and Beyond
                    Studies in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature
Prof. Torres

This course is meant primarily as an introduction to US Latina/Latino literary excellence. While many of our readings might not be explicitly queer, as we read across Latino narrative forms--including stories, novels, memoir, and even some poetry--we will keep a particular focus on representations of gender, identity, sex and sexuality. Along the way we will look at other issues common to Latino narratives as well, such as family, assimilation, authenticity, language, race, class, citizenship, and borderlands; all the fascinations and frustrations of the Latino experience.

English M107B.2                    Gender and the Gothic
                   Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Prof. Griffin

In this class, we will read (and watch) stories that engage with the long tradition of the gothic: stories that are pleasurably thrilling, that structure themselves around suspense, secrecy, romance, intrigue, and even sometimes fear. We will begin the term by focusing on some of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century texts that established and popularized the gothic conventions that novelists, filmmakers, and television writers still use today. We will then turn to more contemporary reactions to the gothic, investigating how twentieth- and twenty-first-century forms respond to the gothic genre. Our focus as we make we our way across the centuries will be on how these stories open up questions about gender. How do gothic texts represent women's bodies? What is the relationship between gender and violence? How do gendered portrayals of the gothic change over time or embody different political and cultural crises? How do popular contemporary forms—the television show, the dystopian novel—reimagine the gothic?

English 128                      Migration, Storytelling, and Postcolonial Hybrids
                     Postcolonial and Transnational Theory 
Prof. Poddar

Exploration of the evolution of postcolonial studies through hybrid works by diasporic writers of color that play with forms of essay, memoir, novel, short story, and poetry. How do our primary texts question literary conventions of more easily classified genres & "mainstream" white, Euro-American storytelling? What manifestations of empire, diasporic mobility, & generic fluidity unite or separate our key texts? What aesthetic or critical possibilities do hybrid forms open up for postcolonial & diaspora studies with their strong penchant toward fragmented, hyphenated identities? Primary texts by Aimé Césaire, Edwige Danticat, Amitav Ghosh, Amitava Kumar, and Laila Lalami. Critical texts unpack concepts like empire, diaspora, rhizome, hybridity, creolization, thalassology, genre, narrative, translation, and more.

Required Texts:
Amitav Ghosh: In an Antique Land, 1993
Vivian Gornick: The Story and the Situation: The Art of Personal Narrative, 2001
Amitava Kumar: Bombay--London--New York, 2002
Edwige Danticat: The Dew Breaker, 2004
Laila Lalami: Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits, 2005
Edwige Danticat: Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work, 2011

English 129                   Marriage Plots and the Novel
                    Topics in Genre Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Critical Theory
Prof. Griffin

This course is about marriage plots: novels that chart their stories based on the pursuit of a spouse. Thus the majority of our texts—spoiler alert!—end in marriage. In looking at novels that span the long nineteenth century, from Jane Austen's 1813 Pride and Prejudice to Virginia Woolf's 1925 Mrs. Dalloway, we will theorize the multitude of meanings that marriage held in Victorian England and how these forms of marriage bolster or destabilize the way we think about marriage and marriage plots today. What do ideal Victorian marriages look like? How does the marriage plot shape gender norms or ideals? Why do so many novels structure their stories around the pursuit and attainment of a spouse?

 English 131                  Islands, Oceans, and Postcolonial Literature
                  Studies in Postcolonial Literatures
Prof. Poddar

From romanticism's pastoral idylls to global tourism's commodification of islands, "contained" coastal spaces remain vulnerable to a long-standing history of imperialist domination – discursive or material. This course will examine the historic & cultural dynamism of islands & oceans (Caribbean, Atlantic, Pacific, Indian Ocean), their negotiation with changing avatars of empire & the unique vantage point a terraqueous literary imagination offers toward rethinking critical debates on empire, ecology, modernity, globalization, and multiculturalism. Primary fiction works by Roxane Gay, Amitav Ghosh, Cristina Henríquez, Michael Ondaatje, and Tiphanie Yanique. Secondary texts from postcolonial, diaspora, oceanic, tourism & environmental studies, including works by Elizabeth DeLoughrey, Edouard Glissant, Paul Gilroy, Epeli Hau'ofa, Françoise Lionnet, and Antonio Benítez-Rojo.

Required Texts:
Robert Young: Postcolonialism: A Very Short Introduction, 2003
Amitav Ghosh: Sea of Poppies, 2008
Michael Ondaatje: The Cat's Table, 2011
Roxane Gay: An Untamed State, 2014
Cristina Henríquez: The Book of Unknown Americans, 2014
Tiphanie Yanique: Land of Love and Drowning, 2014

English 139                  Virginia Woolf
                  Individual Authors
Prof. Hornby

This course will explore Virginia Woolf's major works. We will address the central questions of how Woolf cultivates discourses of British modernism and how she responds to modernism's particular aesthetic mandates. We will consider how she experiments with genre: in particular, how she charts the territory between fiction and biography in her work. What is the relationship between her own life and the fictional worlds that she creates? How does she theorize biography? In addition to her novels and short fiction, we will supplement with readings from her critical essays, diary entries, autobiographical writings, and letters, and we will engage with the scholarly criticism surrounding her writing.

English 164C
                The Novel 1850-1900
                19th-Century Novel
Prof. Dimuro


This course traces the development and emergence of the English novel as the foremost literary genre of the nineteenth century. It focuses on four brilliant authors and their work: Charlotte Brontë's Villette (1853), Charles Dickens's Great Expectations (1861), George Eliot's Middlemarch (1871-1872), and Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady (1882). The approach combines practice in close reading with an awareness of historical, theoretical, and narratological considerations. Writing requirements include two 6-8-page papers, bi-weekly quizzes, and a comprehensive final exam.

English 167A                American Poetry to 1900 Prof. Reed

Walt Whitman has mixed feelings about you taking this class. On one hand, he has assumed American Poetry to 1900, and so, he believes, can you. On the other, in a late-life essay Whitman reflects: "real representative National Literature formates itself (like language, or 'the weather') not from two or three influences, however important, nor indeed from any learned syllabus, or criticism, or what ought to be, nor from any minds or advice of toploftical quarters, but slowly, slowly, curiously, from many more and more, deeper mixings and siftings (especially in America) and generations and years and races, and what largely appears to be chance—but is not chance at all."

Though Whitman is conflicted about the kind of knowledge that a learned syllabus can produce, to me the case is clearer. If you survived Whitman's sentence, certainly if you suspect you liked it, in spite or because of its knots, then this course is for you. The course examines the long foreground for the styles, urges, conflicts, displacements, and ambitions displayed so boldly in Whitman's 1891 pronouncement. Beginning with the Puritan traditions of elegy and meditation (Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor), the syllabus traces the kinds of "mixings and siftings" that poetic forms make possible in America, including the formal feelings of Phillis Wheatley, the imposing decorum of the Fireside Poets, radical symbolisms from Edgar Poe, Henry David Thoreau, and Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt, the "highly wrought style" for which an ensemble of women writers were regarded in their day, those lovely, vexing lyrics of Emily Dickinson, and Paul Laurence Dunbar's dialect accomplishment. If these schools and poets, and some others we cover, have relations with one another that appear not to be chance, the course leaves it to you to exfoliate them in brief weekly responses, a recitation, and two essays.

English 168                 Major American Writers Prof. Pierson

Broad survey of representative American writers across several centuries, designed to give concise account of broad narrative of American literary development, from origins through 19th century. Includes mainly works that have traditionally been identified as American classics and asks both what makes American literature distinctive and what its relations are to other literatures in English.

DOES NOT SATISFY ANY REQUIREMENT FOR AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE MAJORS (OTHER THAN "ENGLISH ELECTIVE").

English 170A
                     American Literature, 1865 to 1900
Prof. Looby

Historical survey of American literature from end of Civil War to beginning of 20th century, including writers such as Howells, James, Twain, Norris, Dickinson, Crane, Chesnutt, Gilman, and others working in modes of realist and naturalist novel, regional and vernacular prose, and poetry.

English 172A                            Drama, 1850 to 1945       
Prof. Goodwin

This survey of drama features plays by English, Irish, and American writers Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, John Synge, Eugene O'Neill, and Tennessee Williams and by European playwrights of the period who influenced English-language theater: August Strindberg, Henrik Ibsen, and Anton Chekhov.

Emphasis in the course is placed on the material as theater and towards this end there will be dramatic reading from the texts and some viewing of scenes on video during our meetings. Except for e-texts of the plays, computers are not welcome in my classroom, which I consider a theater space in time of rehearsal.

The course requirements consist of attendance, participation, a take-home essay assignment, and in-class midterm and final examinations. The weight of each requirement toward the course grade is as follows: attendance and participation 10%, midterm examination 30%, final examination and take-home essay 60%.

English 173C                      Title TBA
                      Contemporary American Poetry
Prof. Mullen

Study of American poetry, mostly by living authors, with emphasis on emergent issues and poetic forms.

English 174A                      American Fiction, 1900 to 1945 Prof. Allmendinger

The first half of the twentieth century was a transitional period in American literature. Looking back nostalgically on the nation's rural, pre-industrial past, writers criticized many of the economic, political, and cultural changes occurring in modern society. The works in this course reveal how Americans responded to many of these tumultuous events, including the Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, two World Wars, urban development, and racial unrest. Authors to be covered include: Willa Cather, John Steinbeck, Nathanael West, Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, Chester Himes, Ernest Hemingway, and Pearl Buck.

English 177                      Social Struggles from McCarthy to Reagan
                    
Interdisciplinary Studies of American Culture
Prof. Perez-Torres

This course looks at U.S. culture produced during a period of significant turmoil and crisis. Historically, this period is framed by two figures sometimes considered emblematic of a certain repressive American character: Senator Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s and President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. So we will look at the relationship between literature, culture, and the social conditions that shape and are shaped by particular cultural objects and forces. While the focus will be on literature, we will approach the literary as one manifestation of cultural expression. We will us analytical tools to "read" a variety of cultural texts in order to garner their various meanings and significances. A large part of the class will involve participation and so attendance in the class is MANDATORY. Some texts we may consider are The Catcher in the Rye, Howl and Other Poems, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Play It as It Lays, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Song of Solomon, and Less Than Zero.NOT OPEN FOR CREDIT TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ENGLISH 177.1 IN FALL 2014.

English 179.1                     Modern Irish Literature and Crisis of Value
                    Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to Present
Prof. McDonald


Given its small size, remarkable number of major modern writers hail from Ireland. Examination of leading exemplars, from late 19th and 20th centuries, including W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Elizabeth Bowen, and several others. How did these authors innovate and break with tradition? What social, cultural, and political forces have helped mold their work? More broadly, how can Irish example help us think together relationship between periphery and center in European modernism? Looking closely at texts in range of genres--poetry, fiction, drama, memoir, critical essay--consideration of Ireland in relation to key aspects of modernity, especially imperialism, nationalism, nihilism, and crisis of value. Students learn about recent work in postcolonial studies and world literature to consider Irish writing in international and comparative terms, alert to generation of cultural value across borders.

English 179.2                       Transgender Fictions
                     Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to Present
Prof. Williford

While it appears that the topic of transgender identity has reached an unprecedented level of visibility in mainstream culture, there is in fact an important history of representations of transgender experiences. This course is called "transgender fictions" in reference to both the fictional representation of trans experiences in cultural productions (textual and visual media), but also in reference to the misunderstandings and misrepresentations of trans lives. In this course we will survey a selection of texts from the past 150 years that provide an historical view of transgender representations through to the present. We will also read critical theoretical texts that confront social identities based on gender expression, which offer insights into the challenges, pains, and pleasures of transgender lives.

GENDER, RACE, ETHNICITY, DISABILITY, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES

English M101B                 Pre-Stonewall LGBT/Queer Literature since 1855
             Queer Literatures and Cultures, 1850-1970
Prof. Little

Surveys or focuses on discrete period of queer literature and culture from c. 1850 to 1970. Works by such writers as Walt Whitman, Radclyffe Hall, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Langston Hughes, Tennessee Williams, Henry Blake Fuller, and James Baldwin are some of the possible candidates of study.

English M103              Shakespearean Disability Studies
             Studies in Disability Literatures
Prof. Gottlieb

What happens when we look at Shakespeare's plays through the lenses provided by disability studies? Shakespeare's plays are full of characters with disabilities, but these representations have only recently begun to receive critical attention. This course will introduce you to disability studies and Shakespeare studies by exploring the dynamic points of contact between the two.

We will consider how physical and mental differences are marked in texts and performed on stage and in film. We will examine the construction of dis/ability in relation to constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Through analyzing representations of disability in Shakespeare's time and in our own, you will be introduced to the history of disability and will become familiar with major concepts in disability studies.

English M104A             Early African American Literature
Prof. Yarborough

Survey of African American literature from the 18th century to World War I, including oral and written forms (folktales, spirituals, sermons; fiction, poetry, essays). Authors covered include Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Charles Chesnutt, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The class will focus both on the historical and cultural contexts for the literary works and also on strategies for engaging formal aspects of the assigned materials.

English M105E
          Queering Latino Literature:
            From Machismo to Feminism and Beyond
           Studies in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature
Prof. Torres

This course is meant primarily as an introduction to US Latina/Latino literary excellence. While many of our readings might not be explicitly queer, as we read across Latino narrative forms--including stories, novels, memoir, and even some poetry--we will keep a particular focus on representations of gender, identity, sex and sexuality. Along the way we will look at other issues common to Latino narratives as well, such as family, assimilation, authenticity, language, race, class, citizenship, and borderlands; all the fascinations and frustrations of the Latino experience.

English M107A              American Women Writers:
              History, Culture, and Creativity
           Studies in Women's Writing
Prof. Rowe

How do women write their bodies, their selves? "American Women Writers: History, Culture, and Creativity" traces the evolution of women's writing from mid-19th to late 20th- century America. Texts examine issues of self-identity; matrilineal ancestral heritages; sexual passion; suitors, husbands, wives, lovers; the ideology of domesticity and of feminism; and artistic ways women imagine themselves as historical, political, ethnic, and erotic subjects. Whether it's a short story, poem, journalistic essay, novel or an autobiography, biomythography, cuentos, or historia, we read Alcott, Jacobs, Chopin, Gilman, Walker, Cisneros, Yamamoto, Viramontes, Marshall, Anzaldúa, and Kingston. How do women's different ethnic cultures shape their lives and writing? This course offers increasingly sophisticated ways to read texts and to understand the diversity of women's self-expression. All women need a voice and choice, as we seek in and though literary art to discover and articulate a vibrant sense of new selves, new lives, new muses.

Students taking this course are strongly encouraged to enroll in the associated 2-unit adjunct course, English 110B.1, for fall quarter, 2016, with S. Lewak (M 3-4:50pm). English 110B represents an addition to the English curriculum which provides students an opportunity to strengthen their writing skills while accruing additional units to meet graduation requirements in a more timely manner. Students who complete 2 separate sections of English 110B as majors in American Literature & Culture or English will be permitted to pair them to satisfy one elective requirement for their major.

English M107B.1           Mother, Warrior, Monster:
             From Ancient Myth to Shakespeare's Coriolanus
           Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Prof. Burdorff

All too frequently in socio-literary criticism, men and women are treated as binary opposites, divided along the same axes as nature and culture, war and peace, or life and death. This course will challenge those binary ideations in a very specific way, focusing not on the differences, but rather on the similarities between two representative figures: the mother and the warrior. In particular, we will examine their shared associations with animalistic predation; corporeal materiality; cultural peripherality, liminality, or non-belonging; and, especially, violence and bloodshed, both destructive and paradoxically generative.

Through the critical lens of "monster studies"—a perspective that values so-called "monsters" for their semiotic multivalence, their symbolic ambiguity, or their ability to mean multiple things at once—we will investigate the complex, transhistorical interrelationships between several mother-warrior pairs, including Achilles/Hector and Hecuba; Clytemnestra and Agamemnon; Beowulf and Grendel's mother; and Volumnia and Coriolanus from Shakespeare's Coriolanus. In addition, we will discuss several other figures—both female and male—who similarly complicate the binary opposition of woman/mother and warrior, including Medea, Procne and Philomela, Richard III and Queen Margaret, and Queen Elizabeth I.

Primary-text selections will range from ancient Greco-Roman epic and drama, through the poetry of the Middle Ages, to the early-modern English tragedies of Shakespeare. Corollary readings will also offer perspectives on premodern obstetrics—the gestating, birthing body and its fetal occupant—as well as a survey of ancient and classical heroic ideals. In addition to readings, required course work will include several short written assignments, both in and out of class; quizzes on reading and lecture material; an essay; and a final exam.

English M107B.2           Gender and the Gothic
         Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Prof. Griffin

In this class, we will read (and watch) stories that engage with the long tradition of the gothic: stories that are pleasurably thrilling, that structure themselves around suspense, secrecy, romance, intrigue, and even sometimes fear. We will begin the term by focusing on some of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century texts that established and popularized the gothic conventions that novelists, filmmakers, and television writers still use today. We will then turn to more contemporary reactions to the gothic, investigating how twentieth- and twenty-first-century forms respond to the gothic genre. Our focus as we make we our way across the centuries will be on how these stories open up questions about gender. How do gothic texts represent women's bodies? What is the relationship between gender and violence? How do gendered portrayals of the gothic change over time or embody different political and cultural crises? How do popular contemporary forms—the television show, the dystopian novel—reimagine the gothic?

English 129          Marriage Plots and the Novel
         Topics in Genre Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Critical Theory
Prof. Griffin

This course is about marriage plots: novels that chart their stories based on the pursuit of a spouse. Thus the majority of our texts—spoiler alert!—end in marriage. In looking at novels that span the long nineteenth century, from Jane Austen's 1813 Pride and Prejudice to Virginia Woolf's 1925 Mrs. Dalloway, we will theorize the multitude of meanings that marriage held in Victorian England and how these forms of marriage bolster or destabilize the way we think about marriage and marriage plots today. What do ideal Victorian marriages look like? How does the marriage plot shape gender norms or ideals? Why do so many novels structure their stories around the pursuit and attainment of a spouse?

English 139       Virginia Woolf
      Individual Authors
Prof. Hornby

This course will explore Virginia Woolf's major works. We will address the central questions of how Woolf cultivates discourses of British modernism and how she responds to modernism's particular aesthetic mandates. We will consider how she experiments with genre: in particular, how she charts the territory between fiction and biography in her work. What is the relationship between her own life and the fictional worlds that she creates? How does she theorize biography? In addition to her novels and short fiction, we will supplement with readings from her critical essays, diary entries, autobiographical writings, and letters, and we will engage with the scholarly criticism surrounding her writing.

English 145         The Virgin, the Wife, and the Widow:
        Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
        Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent
Prof. Thomas

The category of the holy life offers a space for thinking through the relationship between the church and holy women, between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, between rebellion and conformity. Ranging from the lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides and chaste wives, we will focus on the ways in which the holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow shaped norms of medieval Church by rebelling against and at same time conforming to them. We will close read the lives of such women (and a few holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues from virginity to marriage, from travel to enclosure. Questions for discussion include: Why did holy women come to play increasingly dominant roles in the Middle Ages? What were ways in which they used their virginity or chastity to find agency within ecclesiastical norms designed to control their lives?

NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ENGLISH 142 WITH THE SAME TITLE IN SPRING OR FALL, 2014, WITH PROFESSOR THOMAS.

English 163C                Jane Austen and Her Peers Prof. Charles

"Jane Austen in Context"

Intensive study of Jane Austen's six complete novels, along with select juvenilia, literature written by her contemporaries, and her ongoing fan culture. We will focus both on Austen's formal innovations and on the historical problems that she engaged, including slavery and women's rights.

English 179.2                  Transgender Fictions
                Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to Present
Prof. Williford

While it appears that the topic of transgender identity has reached an unprecedented level of visibility in mainstream culture, there is in fact an important history of representations of transgender experiences. This course is called "transgender fictions" in reference to both the fictional representation of trans experiences in cultural productions (textual and visual media), but also in reference to the misunderstandings and misrepresentations of trans lives. In this course we will survey a selection of texts from the past 150 years that provide an historical view of transgender representations through to the present. We will also read critical theoretical texts that confront social identities based on gender expression, which offer insights into the challenges, pains, and pleasures of transgender lives.

IMPERIAL, TRANSNATIONAL, AND POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES

English 128                      Migration, Storytelling, and Postcolonial Hybrids
                     Postcolonial and Transnational Theory 
Prof. Poddar

Exploration of the evolution of postcolonial studies through hybrid works by diasporic writers of color that play with forms of essay, memoir, novel, short story, and poetry. How do our primary texts question literary conventions of more easily classified genres & "mainstream" white, Euro-American storytelling? What manifestations of empire, diasporic mobility, & generic fluidity unite or separate our key texts? What aesthetic or critical possibilities do hybrid forms open up for postcolonial & diaspora studies with their strong penchant toward fragmented, hyphenated identities? Primary texts by Aimé Césaire, Edwige Danticat, Amitav Ghosh, Amitava Kumar, and Laila Lalami. Critical texts unpack concepts like empire, diaspora, rhizome, hybridity, creolization, thalassology, genre, narrative, translation, and more.

Required Texts:
Amitav Ghosh: In an Antique Land, 1993
Vivian Gornick: The Story and the Situation: The Art of Personal Narrative, 2001
Amitava Kumar: Bombay--London--New York, 2002
Edwige Danticat: The Dew Breaker, 2004
Laila Lalami: Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits, 2005
Edwige Danticat: Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work, 2011

English 131                  Islands, Oceans, and Postcolonial Literature
                  Studies in Postcolonial Literatures
Prof. Poddar

From romanticism's pastoral idylls to global tourism's commodification of islands, "contained" coastal spaces remain vulnerable to a long-standing history of imperialist domination – discursive or material. This course will examine the historic & cultural dynamism of islands & oceans (Caribbean, Atlantic, Pacific, Indian Ocean), their negotiation with changing avatars of empire & the unique vantage point a terraqueous literary imagination offers toward rethinking critical debates on empire, ecology, modernity, globalization, and multiculturalism. Primary fiction works by Roxane Gay, Amitav Ghosh, Cristina Henríquez, Michael Ondaatje, and Tiphanie Yanique. Secondary texts from postcolonial, diaspora, oceanic, tourism & environmental studies, including works by Elizabeth DeLoughrey, Edouard Glissant, Paul Gilroy, Epeli Hau'ofa, Françoise Lionnet, and Antonio Benítez-Rojo.

Required Texts:
Robert Young: Postcolonialism: A Very Short Introduction, 2003
Amitav Ghosh: Sea of Poppies, 2008
Michael Ondaatje: The Cat's Table, 2011
Roxane Gay: An Untamed State, 2014
Cristina Henríquez: The Book of Unknown Americans, 2014
Tiphanie Yanique: Land of Love and Drowning, 2014

English 133                       Transatlantic Fictions (1500-1700)
                     
Transatlantic Literatures and Cultures
Prof. Fuchs

This course explores how early modern Europe digests and assimilates the New World, with a special emphasis on English texts. The course considers the genres of encounter and colonization—-letters, travel narratives, chronicles, utopias-—and the transformation of those genres by later English authors. How do problems of quotation, translation, and certification shape European visions of the Americas? How do literary strategies relate to imperial goals? We will address the relation between desire and conquest; the contrasts between Renaissance conceptions of the New World and first-person, experiential accounts, and the role of language in the American exchanges. We will compare imaginative and historiographical accounts, focusing on how texts deal with problems of truth and authority in representation. In short, we will learn how to read highly self-conscious texts for their rhetorical and ideological goals, exploring how the broad category of the transatlantic enables investigation beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries. In our writing and class assignments, we will focus on how to make arguments about literary and historical texts, and how to think critically about the transatlantic encounter.

English 165A                Imperial Culture, 1700-1850 Prof. Hollander

With readings including Arabian Nights Entertainments, A Modest Proposal, and the Turkish Embassy Letters, this course will examine imperialism and transnationalism throughout the eighteenth century and into the nineteenth. Topics will include slavery and commodity culture, emerging technologies, intersections of gender and race, otherness, Orientalism, and nationalist projects. Other readings are Alexander Pope's Windsor-Forest, the epistolary exchanges between Ignatius Sancho and Samuel Johnson, as well as pertinent historical documents and print media.

English 166A                   Colonial Beginnings of American Literature
    Prof. Colacurcio

Historical survey of American literatures of discovery and exploration, contact, and settlement, with emphasis on genres that express distinctive colonial identities, myths, and religious visions.

GENRE STUDIES, INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES, CRITICAL THEORY

English M107B.2          Gender and the Gothic
         Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Prof. Griffin

In this class, we will read (and watch) stories that engage with the long tradition of the gothic: stories that are pleasurably thrilling, that structure themselves around suspense, secrecy, romance, intrigue, and even sometimes fear. We will begin the term by focusing on some of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century texts that established and popularized the gothic conventions that novelists, filmmakers, and television writers still use today. We will then turn to more contemporary reactions to the gothic, investigating how twentieth- and twenty-first-century forms respond to the gothic genre. Our focus as we make we our way across the centuries will be on how these stories open up questions about gender. How do gothic texts represent women's bodies? What is the relationship between gender and violence? How do gendered portrayals of the gothic change over time or embody different political and cultural crises? How do popular contemporary forms—the television show, the dystopian novel—reimagine the gothic?

English 115B           British Popular Literature Prof. Stephan


"Forms of the Gothic in British Popular Literature"

Gothic conventions—crumbling castles, supernatural villains, damsels in distress, dark doubles—have survived, thrived, and evolved in British popular fiction over the course of three centuries. In this course, we will explore examples of Gothic fiction from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. We will consider its historical and cultural contexts as well as its enduring mass appeal. Texts will include Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho, Wilkie Collins's The Woman in White, and Bram Stoker's Dracula, as well as shorter works by Charles Dickens, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Elizabeth Gaskell, Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, M. R. James, and Angela Carter.

English 115D            Detective Fiction
Prof. Allmendinger


In this course we will study the evolution of the mystery genre, beginning with Edgar Allan Poe, whose short stories paved the way for the British detective genre, epitomized by Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie. We will contrast this tradition with the American school of hardboiled fiction, or noir, as practiced by Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett, and Walter Mosley, whose African American characters offer a different perspective on a tradition usually practiced by white English and American writers. Finally, we will examine two off-shoots of the mystery/detective tradition--suspense and horror--represented by Patricia Highsmith's The Talented Mr. Ripley and Thomas Harris' Red Dragon, the prequel to The Silence of the Lambs.

English 118C             From "Howl" to Hunger Games:
            Imagining Dystopia in Literature and Film
             Studies in Visual Culture
Prof. Lewak

How do we imagine dystopian worlds? Why are we so fascinated with them? And how has the development of special and visual effects changed our conversation about them? We will begin to explore these questions through an examination of a few post-1945 works of 20th and 21st literature and their cinematic counterparts. The class will begin with Allen Ginsberg's poem "Howl" (and the 2010 James Franco film of the same name). Next we will read Philip K. Dick's 1968 novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (and watch Ridley Scott's 1982/2007 cinematic adaptation, Blade Runner), Arthur C. Clarke's 1968 novel 2001: A Space Odyssey (adapted into the 1968 film of the same name co-constructed by Clarke and Stanley Kubrick), and Yann Martel's 2001 novel, Life of Pi (as well as the 2012 film by Ang Lee, Life of Pi). The course will end with the 2008 novel The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (juxtaposed to Gary Ross's 2012 cinematic version, The Hunger Games).

English 120                         History of Aesthetics and Critical Theory          Prof. Huehls


This class investigates the canonical texts grounding the history of aesthetics, critical theory, and interpretation from the Greeks through the 19th century. Readings include but are not limited to selections from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Sydney, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Wilde.

English 128               Migration, Storytelling, and Postcolonial Hybrids
              Postcolonial and Transnational Theory 
Prof. Poddar

Exploration of the evolution of postcolonial studies through hybrid works by diasporic writers of color that play with forms of essay, memoir, novel, short story, and poetry. How do our primary texts question literary conventions of more easily classified genres & "mainstream" white, Euro-American storytelling? What manifestations of empire, diasporic mobility, & generic fluidity unite or separate our key texts? What aesthetic or critical possibilities do hybrid forms open up for postcolonial & diaspora studies with their strong penchant toward fragmented, hyphenated identities? Primary texts by Aimé Césaire, Edwige Danticat, Amitav Ghosh, Amitava Kumar, and Laila Lalami. Critical texts unpack concepts like empire, diaspora, rhizome, hybridity, creolization, thalassology, genre, narrative, translation, and more.

Required Texts:
Amitav Ghosh: In an Antique Land, 1993
Vivian Gornick: The Story and the Situation: The Art of Personal Narrative, 2001
Amitava Kumar: Bombay--London--New York, 2002
Edwige Danticat: The Dew Breaker, 2004
Laila Lalami: Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits, 2005
Edwige Danticat: Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work, 2011

English 129                 Marriage Plots and the Novel
                  Topics in Genre Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Critical Theory
Prof. Griffin

This course is about marriage plots: novels that chart their stories based on the pursuit of a spouse. Thus the majority of our texts—spoiler alert!—end in marriage. In looking at novels that span the long nineteenth century, from Jane Austen's 1813 Pride and Prejudice to Virginia Woolf's 1925 Mrs. Dalloway, we will theorize the multitude of meanings that marriage held in Victorian England and how these forms of marriage bolster or destabilize the way we think about marriage and marriage plots today. What do ideal Victorian marriages look like? How does the marriage plot shape gender norms or ideals? Why do so many novels structure their stories around the pursuit and attainment of a spouse?

English 139           Virginia Woolf
           Individual Authors
Prof. Hornby

This course will explore Virginia Woolf's major works. We will address the central questions of how Woolf cultivates discourses of British modernism and how she responds to modernism's particular aesthetic mandates. We will consider how she experiments with genre: in particular, how she charts the territory between fiction and biography in her work. What is the relationship between her own life and the fictional worlds that she creates? How does she theorize biography? In addition to her novels and short fiction, we will supplement with readings from her critical essays, diary entries, autobiographical writings, and letters, and we will engage with the scholarly criticism surrounding her writing.

English 163C                Jane Austen and Her Peers Prof. Charles

"Jane Austen in Context"

Intensive study of Jane Austen's six complete novels, along with select juvenilia, literature written by her contemporaries, and her ongoing fan culture. We will focus both on Austen's formal innovations and on the historical problems that she engaged, including slavery and women's rights.

English 164C
           The Novel 1850-1900
           19th-Century Novel
Prof. Dimuro


This course traces the development and emergence of the English novel as the foremost literary genre of the nineteenth century. It focuses on four brilliant authors and their work: Charlotte Brontë's Villette (1853), Charles Dickens's Great Expectations (1861), George Eliot's Middlemarch (1871-1872), and Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady (1882). The approach combines practice in close reading with an awareness of historical, theoretical, and narratological considerations. Writing requirements include two 6-8-page papers, bi-weekly quizzes, and a comprehensive final exam.

English 167A            American Poetry to 1900 Prof. Reed

Walt Whitman has mixed feelings about you taking this class. On one hand, he has assumed American Poetry to 1900, and so, he believes, can you. On the other, in a late-life essay Whitman reflects: "real representative National Literature formates itself (like language, or 'the weather') not from two or three influences, however important, nor indeed from any learned syllabus, or criticism, or what ought to be, nor from any minds or advice of toploftical quarters, but slowly, slowly, curiously, from many more and more, deeper mixings and siftings (especially in America) and generations and years and races, and what largely appears to be chance—but is not chance at all."

Though Whitman is conflicted about the kind of knowledge that a learned syllabus can produce, to me the case is clearer. If you survived Whitman's sentence, certainly if you suspect you liked it, in spite or because of its knots, then this course is for you. The course examines the long foreground for the styles, urges, conflicts, displacements, and ambitions displayed so boldly in Whitman's 1891 pronouncement. Beginning with the Puritan traditions of elegy and meditation (Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor), the syllabus traces the kinds of "mixings and siftings" that poetic forms make possible in America, including the formal feelings of Phillis Wheatley, the imposing decorum of the Fireside Poets, radical symbolisms from Edgar Poe, Henry David Thoreau, and Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt, the "highly wrought style" for which an ensemble of women writers were regarded in their day, those lovely, vexing lyrics of Emily Dickinson, and Paul Laurence Dunbar's dialect accomplishment. If these schools and poets, and some others we cover, have relations with one another that appear not to be chance, the course leaves it to you to exfoliate them in brief weekly responses, a recitation, and two essays.

English 172A                    Drama, 1850 to 1945       
Prof. Goodwin

This survey of drama features plays by English, Irish, and American writers Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, John Synge, Eugene O'Neill, and Tennessee Williams and by European playwrights of the period who influenced English-language theater: August Strindberg, Henrik Ibsen, and Anton Chekhov.

Emphasis in the course is placed on the material as theater and towards this end there will be dramatic reading from the texts and some viewing of scenes on video during our meetings. Except for e-texts of the plays, computers are not welcome in my classroom, which I consider a theater space in time of rehearsal.

The course requirements consist of attendance, participation, a take-home essay assignment, and in-class midterm and final examinations. The weight of each requirement toward the course grade is as follows: attendance and participation 10%, midterm examination 30%, final examination and take-home essay 60%.

English 173C              Title TBA
              Contemporary American Poetry
Prof. Mullen

Study of American poetry, mostly by living authors, with emphasis on emergent issues and poetic forms.

English 174A                American Fiction, 1900 to 1945 Prof. Allmendinger

The first half of the twentieth century was a transitional period in American literature. Looking back nostalgically on the nation's rural, pre-industrial past, writers criticized many of the economic, political, and cultural changes occurring in modern society. The works in this course reveal how Americans responded to many of these tumultuous events, including the Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, two World Wars, urban development, and racial unrest. Authors to be covered include: Willa Cather, John Steinbeck, Nathanael West, Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, Chester Himes, Ernest Hemingway, and Pearl Buck.

English 179.2                  Transgender Fictions
                Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to Present
Prof. Williford

While it appears that the topic of transgender identity has reached an unprecedented level of visibility in mainstream culture, there is in fact an important history of representations of transgender experiences. This course is called "transgender fictions" in reference to both the fictional representation of trans experiences in cultural productions (textual and visual media), but also in reference to the misunderstandings and misrepresentations of trans lives. In this course we will survey a selection of texts from the past 150 years that provide an historical view of transgender representations through to the present. We will also read critical theoretical texts that confront social identities based on gender expression, which offer insights into the challenges, pains, and pleasures of transgender lives.


CREATIVE WRITING

Admission to all Creative Writing Workshops by application only. Applicants must have completed English Composition 3 and English 4W or 4HW to be eligible. Applicants who have not met these requirements by Fall 2016 will NOT be considered for any workshops.

English 136.1   Creative Writing: Poetry
  
Creative Writing Workshop
Prof. D'Aguiar


The entry process for this poetry writing workshop is a writing sample of six poems emailed to me (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) no later than Friday, September 9, before the beginning of classes in the fall. Let me know if you've completed a creative writing class and in what genre. I'll post an announcement of the class list of admitted students in the main English Department office at the beginning of the first week of classes.

The reading list for the class is Citizen (Graywolf, 2014) by Claudia Rankine (buy it, read it multiple times) along with a selection of various other poets that I'll provide.

Students write an original poem each week for the workshop process. There is a final portfolio of the revised poems presented at workshop, rather than a final exam. The final grade is a mix of full attendance, the weekly poetry assignment, contribution to workshop discussion and the submission of a final portfolio.

English 136.2 Creative Writing: Poetry
Creative Writing Workshop
Prof. Mullen

Applications are due by 4:00 PM on September 16.

Course description: In this creative writing workshop, students must write original poetry and submit multiple copies of their drafts for class discussion. Each student is also required to contribute constructive written and oral feedback to fellow writers, and to make an oral presentation on the work of a published poet. Criteria for grading include regular and punctual attendance and completion of assignments, participation in discussion with respectful critique of fellow writers, as well as a final portfolio of revised poems. Enrollment is by instructor consent.

To apply for enrollment, please submit five poems, along with your student identification number, and a brief statement about your interest in reading and writing poetry and your previous experience in literature and creative writing courses. Please deliver a print copy to the English Department Office and also send an electronic version to me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.:

Professor Mullen
149 Humanities Building
UCLA English Department
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1530

Students on the wait list should attend the first class meeting for a chance to claim any spaces that open up.

English 137.1   Creative Writing: Short Story
  
Creative Writing Workshop
Prof. Simpson

This class will be an intensive workshop on the reading and writing of short fiction. We will read both classical and contemporary short stories every week. Students will be expected to reread and study these stories, to learn from their formal properties. The teacher's primary goal in this class will be to develop a daily practice of writing in the students and to foster and train their capacity to recognize what's best in their work. Students will be asked to write a short story every week, in response to a specific assignment. We will also consider the art of revision. Students will revise and complete two stories by the quarter's end, in addition to the weekly exercises.

To be considered for the class, please submit five pages of fiction, double spaced, and tell me what workshops you've taken in the past. Please list your favorite three short stories and tell me what book you're reading right now.

If you are applying to both workshops and have a preference, please indicate that preference. Submissions must be emailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. When emailing your submission, please put your name, the course and section number in the subject line (for example: Williams, 137.1).

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST INCLUDE 137.1 IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE SEPEMBER 9.

NOTE: A list of accepted students will be posted in the English department office by September 22.

Unfortunately, due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students' submitted work.

English 137.2 Creative Writing: Short Story
Creative Writing Workshop
Prof. Torres

This class is an intensive workshop on the reading and writing of short fiction. We will consider the short story form, reading great short stories weekly, which students will be asked to study intensively and to reread. Students will write both shorter weekly stories, and two longer stories. The teacher's primary goal in the class is to help the students develop a daily practice of writing and to foster and train their ability recognize what's best in their work. We'll also discuss revision and the development of a sound critical faculty.

To be considered for the class, please submit five pages (double spaced) of your fiction and tell me what workshops you've taken in the past. Also, please list your three favorite short stories and their authors. Mention the book you're reading right now.

If you are applying to both workshops and have a preference, please indicate that preference. Submissions must be e-mailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. When e-mailing submissions, please put your last name and the course and section number in the subject line (example: Williams 137.2).

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN "137.2" IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE BY SEPT 9th.

NOTE: A list of students accepted into the class will be posted in English Department Office on Sept 19th.

Unfortunately, due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students' submitted work.

SENIOR ENGLISH CAPSTONES/SEMINARS

English 181A             Theory of the Novel
            Topics in Genre Studies
Prof. Dimuro

We will study the differences between the novel as a genre and the novel as a sub-category of narrative. Most of the readings are theoretical, but we also read three novels from the nineteenth century that lend themselves to theoretical analysis: Jane Austen's Emma, Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, and Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady.

NOT OPEN FOR CREDIT TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ENGLISH 184.8 IN SPRING 2014 OR 184.1 IN FALL 2014 UNDER THE SAME COURSE TITLE.

English 181B.1               Boredom and Anxiety in Literature and Film
            Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies
Prof. Hornby

This course explores the entanglements of boredom and anxiety in the context of modernity. We will consider how literary and philosophical texts and other works of art have offered models for thinking about the relationship between boredom and anxiety. What kind of aesthetic category is boredom? What are the temporalities of boredom and anxiety? How does technology address questions of attention and distraction? How does boredom generate anxiety? What does it mean to create a work of art that is supposed to be boring? We will consider work by Charles Baudelaire, Soren Kierkegaard, Sigmund Freud, Charlie Chaplin, Katherine Mansfield, Virginia Woolf, Samuel Beckett and Chantal Akerman, among others.

English 181B.2                The Biomedical Imaginary:
              Chemical Experiments and Cross-Species Entanglements
              Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies
Prof. Lee

In this seminar we will read fiction, poetry, and memoir that, on the one hand, reflect in a speculative and historical manner on the management of human and other biological life via synthetic chemicals as well as that portray the quiet catastrophes that occur from the unintentional or poorly regulated release of environmental toxicants. We will survey historical documents such as accounts of suffocation by mustard gas in WWI, to speculative fictions that dream of a world where children can "scent"—that is, communicate via odors that are calming to those smelling them, affecting them without their even knowing. Required readings will likely include works by Aldous Huxley, Margaret Atwood, Kimiko Hahn, Susanne Atonnetta, Greg Bear, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Ruth Ozeki.

English 182B                Staging Race in Shakespeare's Early Modern England
               Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature
Prof. Little

Concentrating on the period between mid-1500s and the early 1600s, our course exams the ways the emergence of a more systematic construction of race was being played out most especially on the early modern stage. Shakespeare and his contemporaries were not simply representing raced subjects but defining what it meant to be a raced subject in early modern England. While students in the seminar will be made aware of the role race played in early modern science, religion, and commerce, we will focus our main reading and discussion on plays written by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson among them. Some of the plays we will study are Othello, The Merchant of Venice, The Jew of Malta, The Battle of Alcazar, and The Masque of Blackness.

English 183C.1                 Immigrant Stories: Literary and Cinematic
               Topics in 20th- and 21st-Century American Literature
Prof. Decker

This course examines literary and cinematic representations of the immigrant experience in order to explore the relationship between artistic expression and national belonging. We survey changing contexts for life in the old country, reasons for emigration, immigrants' reactions to the U.S. and America's reaction to its immigrants. Changing attitudes toward the individual, family, class mobility, gender roles, sexuality, and racial difference will be considered in the relation to the lure of melting pot assimilation and the persistence of ethnic identity. We analyze novels and films as distinct mediums even as we study their affinities, such as an impulse toward narrative storytelling. Among our movies, one is from the silent era (Charlie Chaplin's The Immigrant) and others include English subtitles for foreign language scenes (America America, The Godfather); among our novels, one is a wordless story of sequenced, illustrated panels (The Arrival) while others might be described as verbose or loquacious (Call It Sleep, The Woman Warrior, Middlesex).

English 183C.2                    Literature of the Beat Generation
                 Topics in 20th and 21st-Century American Literature
Prof. Dickey

Exploration of Beat phenomenon in its historical and cultural moment. Locates Beat literature in tradition of American Romantic writing. Concentration on works by William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Jack Kerouac, paying some attention to other figures like Neal Cassady, Gregory Corso, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti, whose lives and works in some way confront and contest pedestrian values of 1950s America (and after). Investigation of aesthetic principles which Beats appropriated from diverse sources--Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Bebop--to ratify their own contrivances of spontaneity. Consideration of predecessors (e.g., James Fenimore Cooper, Walt Whitman, Henry Miller) and inheritors (e.g., Ken Kesey, Sam Shepard, Hunter S. Thompson) whose works illuminate achievement, or fried shoes, of Beats.

English 184.1                          Narrating the 1960s:
                  Creative Nonfiction in an Age of Electronic Media

                   Capstone Seminar
Prof. Decker

Capstone Seminar

This course examines the New Journalism movement and the society that gave rise to it. At the start of the 1960s, novelist Philip Roth confessed that television news produced in him a "professional envy" and that newspapers filled him with "wonder and awe." How, Roth asked, should the novelist in the 1960s respond an American reality that outstrips the writer's talents? As the decade wore on with political assassinations, civil rights protests, the sexual revolution, hippie drug culture, the space race, and the Vietnam War escalating alongside television's reach, some of America's best writers turned to an emergent literary genre dubbed New Journalism, which is journalism that reads like a novel. In this class we read prominent New Journalists, such as Truman Capote (In Cold Blood), Joan Didion (The White Album), Norman Mailer (Armies of the Night) and Hunter S. Thompson (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas), and analyze reportage of the decade's hot button issues across print (book, magazine and newspaper) and electronic (TV and film) forms.

English 184.2                   George Eliot
                  Capstone Seminar
Prof. Grossman

Capstone Seminar

In this seminar we will read together one of the nineteenth-century's most famous novels: George Eliot's Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life. The history of science, marriage, gender, religion, crime, and money: all and more constitute live topics for this novel—up for discussion in this seminar. We will also study carefully this novel's form as a novel: its crisscrossing multiplots, its omniscient narration as well as its rendering of characters, its serialized publication, and more. Throughout one particular question animating your professor will be what it might mean to describe this novel, or any novel, with the scientific-sounding phrase "A Study of...".

English 184.3                    Literature and Philosophy
                  Capstone Seminar
Prof. Nersessian

Capstone Seminar

There is, Plato tells us, an "ancient quarrel" between poets and philosophers. If we take his word for it, philosophers are interested in the truth, while poets are interested only in beautiful lies. This seminar tackles the big questions at stake in this legendary conflict. Can a work of art tell the truth? What kind of person is a literary character; what kind of thing is a metaphor? Does the artist have ethical or political responsibilities? How did literature and philosophy come to be so hostile to each another, and how have some writers and thinkers tried to overcome this hostility? Together we will engage aesthetic and theoretical materials from the classical to the contemporary, from treatises to poems to works of visual art. Prior experience in a philosopy course is welcome but neither necessary nor expected. Philosophical readings will include Plato, Marx, Foucault, Stanley Cavell, Donald Davidson and others; literary texts will include Lucretius, Shakespeare, the Romantics, one novel, and a selection of twentieth- and twenty-first century poetry.

English 184.4                     Virgins and Viragos:
                Female Mystics and Late Medieval Church
                    Capstone Seminar
Prof. Thomas

Capstone Seminar

Stories of holy women – hagiographical narratives - offer a space for thinking through the shifting relationship between the church and the holy woman, between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, between rebellion and conformity. The course extends from the travails of the runaway bride Christina of Markyate to the trials of Marguerite Porete and Joan of Arc, the travels of Margery Kempe, and the "examinations" of Ann Askew. Our focus will be on the narrative characteristics of late medieval hagiography and the cultural work they do. We will read writings about and by holy women alongside relevant trial records, itineraries, maps, illustrations and other institutional documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, from travel to enclosure, from writing to preaching. Questions for discussion include: What make these narratives compelling? To what extent do formal conventions of storytelling help establish female agency in a male-dominated world?

English M191B                      Transnationalism and Chicana/o Literature
                  Topics in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature
Prof. Perez-Torres

This class considers how transnational movements, flows, and circulations have shaped and influenced Chicana/o culture. The material conditions that produce and are produced by national borders as porous and potentially deadly barriers form the underlying focus for analyzing Chicana/o culture. The culture reflects fluid, rich, and multifaceted experiences perceived through a critical lens of Chicana/o consciousness. This consciousness implies an awareness of and commitment to equity and justice as integral to a sense of self as an agent in a complex social world. We will explore the multiple flows and formations that make Chicana/o culture the production of a rich, complex and ever-evolving critical consciousness. Some texts we may look at are Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories by Sandra Cisneros, The Other Side by Rubén Martínez, The Miraculous Day of Amalia Gómez by John Rechy, and What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz.