Slideshow CK


LOWER DIVISION COURSES IN ENGLISH
Please note that these courses do NOT fulfill any requirements for the major in
English or American Literature & Culture or the English minor.

English 19.1 Playful Forms: Creative Writing Workshop
Fiat Lux Freshman Seminar
Prof. Stefans


Most students of writing are familiar with such poetic forms as sonnet, blank verse, and heroic couplet; or with elements of fiction and theater such as plot, rising action, character, and denouement. But there is vast array of forms--some classic, some very new--increasingly used by contemporary writers of poetry, fiction, and plays--such as sestina and lipogram--that are both challenging and liberating for creative writer. Students read works by poet Christian Bök, playwright David Ives, short-story writer Donald Barthelme, and classic Exercises in Style by French writer Raymond Queneau as way to inspire their own writing exercises. Students read their own creative writing exercises and discuss theirs and others' work.

Class meets on January 10, 24, February 7, 21, and March 7.

English 19.2 Origins of Identity: History and Memory in Women's Poetry
Fiat Lux Freshman Seminar
Prof. Rowe

 

Who we are or may become originates in history, each unique by virtue of ethnic heritage, gender, sexuality, spirituality, and individual talents and traits. In personal writings and poetry, women voice maternal stories that also recollect communal history replete with images of homelands, political struggle, and ancestral rituals. Whether reading poetry or creating it, hearing stories or crafting them, or drawing forth dreams of ancient lands and sacred objects, students expected to be contributors and collaborators. By identifying and celebrating personal legacies of being and belonging, students learn how memory and history imprint identity, how past suffuses present. By heeding truths gleaned from ancestral past, each woman comes to know her self and infuses her poetry with distinctive vision and voice that makes lives, both old and new, into poetic memoirs. Remember, Audre Lorde proclaims, "poetry is not a luxury" but "litany of survival."

 

English 85  American Novel Prof. Dimuro

An introduction to some of the great American novels of the last 150 years or so. The course uses current methods of literary study in a way that suits those who are new to them. Students are taught the skills required to read fiction intensively, and to interpret the meaning of texts more confidently and proficiently. Readings include a balance of classic and lesser-known works, all of which have relevant things to say about the American experience. Each novel demonstrates a particular set of innovative achievements in the development of the novel in the United States. The course is organized around three themes: women and freedom (Fanny Fern's Ruth Hall and Kate Chopin's The Awakening); the novel and historical change (William Dean Howells's A Modern Instance and Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence); and race and representation (Charles W. Chesnutt's The Marrow of Tradition). Short papers, attendance, and a final, comprehensive exam are required.

English 88SL Health: Cultural Narratives and Community Practices
  Lower Division Seminars: Special Topics in English
Prof. Gottlieb

This course explores connections between the study of literature and health care practices. Our readings will provide diverse representations of medical treatment, illness, caregiving, disability, and aging. The service-learning component of this course will allow you to gain first-hand knowledge of community health organizations. Examples of questions that will guide our inquiry include: How can health care, illness, aging, and death be represented in literature? How are understandings of health influenced by culture? How are representations of providing and receiving care related to constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, class, dis/ability, and sexuality? How can health care materials and the term "health care" itself be analyzed alongside literary texts? How do texts negotiate tensions between care and work (as paid or unpaid labor)? How is health care related to social justice? What are the ethics of representing patients and other recipients of care? How can literature and the arts be used for advocacy and for therapeutic purposes?

This is a Service Learning course. For more information on Service Learning courses, please visit:

www.uei.ucla.edu/communitylearningservicelearning.htm

English 90 Shakespeare Prof. Dickey

Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare's plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare's breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement.

English 97H Honors Seminar for Freshmen and Sophomores
Prof. Fuchs


"Don Quijote in England"

This seminar explores how Don Quijote, the seminal novel of early modernity, makes its way to England and English literature. We will focus on the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with some attention to contemporary recreations, tracing how texts move between languages and genres. We will pay particular attention to the construction of literary history, as well as problems of authorship and attribution. Students will explore critical and textual methodologies, book history, and performance studies. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Authors include Cervantes, Shelton, Beaumont, Shakespeare and Fletcher, Theobald, and Lennox.

WRITING INTENSIVE COURSES

English 110A                    Writing in the English Major: Analytical
Prof. Cunningham


Disappointed by not receiving the kinds of grades on your writing you'd like to? Wondering what the English department at UCLA considers top-notch writing? "Analytical Writing in the English Major" provides instruction in critical writing about literature and culture for English majors. Its goal is to help students improve their skills and abilities at literary and cultural analysis. It's a workshop for discovering richer literary questions, developing more nuanced analyses of complex texts, sustaining arguments, and developing your own authoritative voice. The course assumes writing is a process, so students write, rewrite, and workshop all writing assignments. Requirements include short writing tasks (1-3 pages) and a final paper (6-8 pages). Grades are based 50% on the final paper (including prewriting and drafts), and 50% on other written assignments and participation. "Analytical Writing in the English Major" qualifies as an elective for the major.

English 110B                     Writing in the English Major: Adjunct Prof. Burdorff
 
This course offers students concurrently enrolled in English 125 (Prof. Maniquis) the opportunity to develop and hone their composition skills. Intensive work on all aspects of the analytical writing process, from assessment of essay prompt to completion of final draft. Note: the reading, writing, and other graded work for this course will be in addition to those assignments given in English 125.

THIS 2-UNIT ADJUNCT COURSE IS ONLY OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO ARE ALSO ENROLLED IN ENGLISH 125 FOR WINTER 2017.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH BEFORE 1500

English 140A               Chaucer: Canterbury Tales              
Prof. Jager

Introductory study of Chaucer's language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his major long poem, "Canterbury Tales." Lectures will focus on the "Tales" as an anthology of character types and literary genres as these reflect social, economic, religious and other features of Chaucer's world.

English 140B               Chaucer: Troilus and Criseyde and Selected Minor Works     
Prof. McNamara


Intensive study of Troilus and Criseyde and selected minor works of Chaucer, such as Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, Parliament of Fowls, etc.

English 141

Early Medieval Literature

Prof. Burdorff


An advanced survey of early medieval British poetry and prose. Using the epic poem Beowulf as a through-line, we will explore a variety themes, motifs, and sociocultural currents of the Anglo-Saxon world, including perspectives on faith, gender, heroism, community, and the past. Readings to include epic, elegy, and other verse forms, as well as chronicle, legal, and historical prose sources. All readings in translation; although we will consider sample texts in Old English, no prior knowledge of the language is required. Graded work to include a midterm exam, in-class quizzes, and a final paper.

English 142

Later Medieval Literature

Prof. Thomas


"Filthy lucre: the Fraudster, Trader and Usurer in the Age of Chaucer and Beyond"

In this course, we will examine the intersection of commerce and literature in a number of pre-modern texts ranging from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, excerpts from Piers Plowman and Robin Hood narratives to a few post-medieval texts such as Gerard Malynes's Saint George for England. We will close-read tales such as "The General Prologue," "The Shipman's Tale," "The Merchant's Tale," "The Pardoner's Tale," and "The Summoner's Tale," in light of thinking about "filthy lucre" ("turpe lucrum") found in treatises on avarice, usury, and simony as well as on money and financial speculation. In approaching these tales contextually, we will explore the extent to which the fraudster, trader and usurer frequently merge and become indistinguishable from each other. By reading fictional texts through the lens of "filthy lucre," we will also understand how theories and practices of medieval commerce shaped them as well as other post-medieval writings.

 English 145

        The Virgin, the Wife, and the Widow:       
          Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women         
     Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent    

Prof. Thomas


The category of the holy life offers a space for thinking through the relationship between the Church and holy women, between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, between rebellion and conformity. Ranging from the lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, we will focus on the ways in which the figure of the holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged the norms of the medieval Church by rebelling against and at same time conforming to them. We will close read the lives (Vitae) of such women (and a few holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues from virginity to marriage, from travel to enclosure. Questions for discussion include: What constitutes femaleness or masculinity? When do medieval notions of gender become consequential for saint-making? When is gender merely incidental? How do the figures of the rebel and reactionary enable female hagiography in a world otherwise known to be hostile to women?

NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ENGLISH 142 WITH THE SAME TITLE IN SPRING OR FALL, 2014, WITH PROFESSOR THOMAS.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH 1500-1700

English 150A                       Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Prof. Watson


Lecture and discussion. A study of Shakespeare's works up through 1603, including some of the Sonnets, Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Merchant of Venice, Henry V, Hamlet, As You Like It, and Twelfth Night .

English 150B                                   Shakespeare: Later Plays                   Prof. Dickey


Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances.

English 153                     London Theater
                    Theatrical Renaissance: Early Modern Texts and Performances
    Prof. Braunmuller


Shakespeare's plays were written in a highly competitive and collaborative theatrical environment. This class surveys the competition, from Christopher Marlowe to Ben Jonson and John Webster and John Ford. Topics include transvestism, same-sex romance, fraud, world-conquering, and much else. Familiarity with Shakespeare, early modern theatre buildings, and the "Industry" would be an advantage for class members.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH 1700-1850

English 119
               Literary London: Tales of Two Cities
            Literary Cities
Prof. Makdisi

For much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, London was a city with a split identity: broad fashionable boulevards and well-lit squares on the one hand, dark and teeming slums on the other; gentlemen and ladies claiming to be of the highest moral order on the one hand, and, on the other, an underworld of rogues, vagabonds, costermongers, prostitutes, pornographers, revolutionaries, conspirators, petty scribblers, ballad singers and outright criminals. This course will explore literary accounts of London's dual identity in this period and on into the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as the literary expressions of the gradual attempt to discover, map out, bring to order and settle the turbulent world of London: to tame and civilize the many resorts of vagabonds, thieves, and outcasts and to turn London into the fast-paced global metropolis that it is today. Readings will draw on a wide variety of sources, from canonical fiction, poetry and the visual arts to first-hand portraits of London streetlife, thieves' memoirs, detective stories, and on to contemporary fiction, graphic novels such as "From Hell" and "V for Vendetta," and zines including Laura Oldfield Ford's "Savage Messiah."

English 161C
            Approaches to the Novel
                Novel in English to 1850    
Prof. Nussbaum

This course will consider the emergence and development of the English novel. We will discuss the formation of the genre, the rise of realism, and fiction's intersections with romance and auto/biography. The texts we read will include an epistolary novel, a Gothic novel, a sentimental novel, an Oriental tale, and novels of manners. This period is known especially for women writers' entrance into the public marketplace, the growth of print culture, the rise of slavery, and the emergence of the British empire, all of which are reflected in its fictions.

English 162A               Earlier Romantic Literature
Prof. Sanchez

"Romanticism and the Culture Wars: Lakers, Cockneys, and the Satanic School of Poetry (Part I)"

Earlier Romantic Literature is the first of a two-part course that will examine the development of romantic literature from 1780 to 1830. In particular, we will discuss this literary development in relation to what some critics refer to as the romantic culture wars, a term used to describe the clash of ideas of liberal and conservative groups over who or what should define the cultural values of nineteenth-century British society. While this two-part course follows the conventional division between earlier and later romantic writings, we will challenge this convention by investigating the reviewing industry that labelled writers as Lakers, Cockneys, and poets of the Satanic School and by evaluating the literary, political, social, and cultural values associated with these groups. In this first part, we will consider the writings of so-called Lake School (Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Southey) and several other poets associated with this group (e.g., Dorothy Wordsworth, Charles Lamb, and Thomas De Quincey). Our goal will be to better understand the political and cultural implications of early-nineteenth-century literary production in order to emphasize the polarized struggle in romantic literature to define British culture in the aftermath of revolution.

English 164C                  Fantastic Journeys in the 19th-Century Novel
               19th-Century Novel
Prof. Hollander

"It is far. But there is no journey upon this earth that a man may not make if he sets his heart to it." - King Solomon's Mines

During the rapidly accelerating technological advances in travel during the nineteenth century, travel became more accessible and also a point of enormous fascination. Adventure stories in places both real and fantastic dominated bestseller lists and captured a vivid part of nineteenth century imagination across the world.

The course will include works by Jules Verne, H. Rider Haggard, Lewis Carroll, Elizabeth Gaskell, L. Frank Baum, Edward Bellamy. We will follow their characters down rabbit holes, 20,000 leagues under the sea, through Wonderland, into the (imagined) future, to an African lost world, and across Oz. Political disturbances, changing economies, imperialist doctrine, and theories of the fantastic are topics we will address. Also, there will be lions.

English 166B                 American Literature, 1776 to 1832
Prof. Colacurcio

Historical survey of American literatures from Revolution through early republic, with emphasis on genres that reflect systematic attempts to create representative national literature and attention to American ethnic, gender, and postcolonial perspectives.

English 169               Blake and Whitman
              Topics in Literature, circa 1700 to 1850
Prof. Cohen &
Prof. Makdisi

This course is an introduction to two of the nineteenth century's most innovative and visionary poets: William Blake and Walt Whitman. Working comparatively, the course will situate each author in the volatile political contexts from which he emerged, the 1790s (Blake) and 1850s (Whitman), as well as the literary, cultural and political histories within and against which they wrote. Students will read through each author's major works and consider their relationship as well as their legacies on later traditions of experimental writing.

LITERATURES IN ENGLISH 1850-PRESENT

English M101C Post-Stonewall Queer Lit
Queer Literatures and Cultures after 1970
Prof. Williford

This class will survey literary and cultural production produced by queers after the Stonewall rebellion in New York in 1969, which is widely regarded as the start of the modern lesbian and gay rights movement in U.S. Writings by such authors as John Rechy, Leslie Feinberg, Essex Hemphill, Audre Lorde, and Alison Bechdel will be included. We will also include some works of the visual arts. Lectures will emphasize historical context and LGBTQ social justice history, especially in the U.S.

English M104B African American Literature from Harlem Renaissance to 1960s Prof. Streeter

Introductory survey of 20th-century African American literature from New Negro Movement of post-World War I period to 1960s, including oral materials (ballads, blues, speeches) and fiction, poetry, and essays by authors such as Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Ralph Ellison.

English M105B Chicana/Chicano Literature from
Mexican Revolution to el Movimiento, 1920 to 1970s
Prof. Lopez

This course looks at the emergence of contemporary notions of chicanismo, or Chicana/o identity, asking what it means to be politically conscious and what role literature plays in that process. We'll survey significant works of Chicana/o literature from the middle of the last century, from the waves of migration following the Mexican Revolution through the consciousness raising of the Chicano Civil Rights Movement (el movimiento), thinking about the relationship between Mexican American politics and aesthetics, investigating how chicanismo continues to evolve in concert with the wider US civil rights movement.

English M105E
  Queering Latinx Literature:
From Machismo to Feminism and Beyond
Studies in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature
Prof. Torres

This course is meant primarily as an introduction to US Latinx literary excellence. While many of our readings might not be explicitly queer, as we read across Latinx narrative forms--including stories, novels, memoir, and even some poetry--we will keep a particular focus on representations of gender, identity, sex and sexuality. Along the way we will look at other issues common to Latinx narratives as well, such as family, assimilation, authenticity, language, race, class, citizenship, and borderlands; all the fascinations and frustrations of the Latinx experience.

English 119

Literary London: Tales of Two Cities
Literary Cities

Prof. Makdisi

For much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, London was a city with a split identity: broad fashionable boulevards and well-lit squares on the one hand, dark and teeming slums on the other; gentlemen and ladies claiming to be of the highest moral order on the one hand, and, on the other, an underworld of rogues, vagabonds, costermongers, prostitutes, pornographers, revolutionaries, conspirators, petty scribblers, ballad singers and outright criminals. This course will explore literary accounts of London's dual identity in this period and on into the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as the literary expressions of the gradual attempt to discover, map out, bring to order and settle the turbulent world of London: to tame and civilize the many resorts of vagabonds, thieves, and outcasts and to turn London into the fast-paced global metropolis that it is today. Readings will draw on a wide variety of sources, from canonical fiction, poetry and the visual arts to first-hand portraits of London streetlife, thieves' memoirs, detective stories, and on to contemporary fiction, graphic novels such as "From Hell" and "V for Vendetta," and zines including Laura Oldfield Ford's "Savage Messiah."

English 139.1 Faulkner
Individual Authors
Prof. Goodwin

The course focus is on the most creative and productive period in William Faulkner's career. The syllabus includes the novels The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Sanctuary, and Light in August; the stories "A Rose for Emily," "Spotted Horses," "Old Man," and those collected in Go Down, Moses; and an examination of Faulkner's work in Hollywood film. Course requirements are attendance, participation, midterm and final in-class examinations, and a five-page paper.

English 169
Blake and Whitman
Topics in Literature, circa 1700 to 1850
Prof. Cohen &
Prof. Makdisi


This course is an introduction to two of the nineteenth century's most innovative and visionary poets: William Blake and Walt Whitman. Working comparatively, the course will situate each author in the volatile political contexts from which he emerged, the 1790s (Blake) and 1850s (Whitman), as well as the literary, cultural and political histories within and against which they wrote. Students will read through each author's major works and consider their relationship as well as their legacies on later traditions of experimental writing.

English 170C
American Literature since 1945
Prof. Lewak

"New Visions"

Study of post-1945 American works from the 1950s (Beat Generation) to the 1990s including (but not limited to) works by Philip K. Dick, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Sherman Alexie.

English 171C 20th-Century British Fiction
Prof. North

Survey of major British novelists and short story writers from 1900 to present.

English 173A American Poetry, 1900 to 1945 Prof. Stefans

This course provides an overview of what is generally known as the Modernist era of American poetry. A central focus of the course will be on the relationship of American poetry to trends in the visual arts (especially painting and film) and concurrent developments in European poetry and art. We start with a consideration of some French poetic trends that were hugely influential on American poets in the early 20th-century, namely Symbolism, the philosophy of Henri Bergson, and the rise of vers libre ("free verse"). From there, we will consider several of the major figures — Gertrude Stein, William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Marianne Moore, Mina Loy, and Robert Frost among others — as they relate to issues such as: Imagism, Dada, the "difficult" poem, the manifesto, the Harlem Renaissance, the African diaspora, verse narrative, continental philosophy, the rise of Fascist politics, and the influence of technology. Weekly writing assignments, including some creative (or re-creative) assignments, a mid-term and final paper.

English 177 Ethnic Comedy, Family Drama:
Interdisciplinary Studies in American Literature and Television
Interdisciplinary Studies of American Culture
Prof. Decker

This course examines the intersection of family and ethnicity as staged in TV comedy and literary memoir and melodrama. We survey the changing composition of the family––idealized and dysfunctional, from extended to nuclear to single-parent––as represented in fictional and nonfictional memoirs about racial segregation and immigrant life (Autobiography of Malcolm X, Portnoy's Complaint, Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen) and primetime sitcoms over the past sixty-five years (Father Knows Best, Amos n Andy, Goldbergs, Addams Family, All In the Family, Mary Tyler Moore Show, Good Times, Cosby Show, Simpsons, Black-ish, Fresh Off the Boat). We conclude by studying the recent appropriation and transformation of the popular Latin American telenovela in U.S.-made melodramatic TV comedies (Ugly Betty, Devious Maids, Jane the Virgin) and Chicana literature (Woman Hollering Creek and So Far From God). Theoretical essays will contribute to our understanding of novels and TV as distinct mediums as well as novel-reading and TV-watching as personal experience and social practice.

English 179 Jane Austen in the Twentieth Century:
Five Mid-Century British Novelists
Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to Present
Prof. Huneven


Jane Austen, who perfected the love plot, also introduced free indirect discourse to the novel. She set the standard for the comic novel of manners and once [laughingly] described the perfect subject as "three or four families in a country village." Her stylistic gifts -- wit, a narrow but wily focus, and a sharp social eye -- have inspired writers for two centuries. This course will trace her influence in the work of five superb 20th Century British women novelists, including Nancy Mitford, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Pym, Penelope Fitzgerald and Elizabeth Jane Howard.

GENDER, RACE, ETHNICITY, DISABILITY, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES

English M101C Post-Stonewall Queer Lit
Queer Literatures and Cultures after 1970
Prof. Williford

This class will survey literary and cultural production produced by queers after the Stonewall rebellion in New York in 1969, which is widely regarded as the start of the modern lesbian and gay rights movement in U.S. Writings by such authors as John Rechy, Leslie Feinberg, Essex Hemphill, Audre Lorde, and Alison Bechdel will be included. We will also include some works of the visual arts. Lectures will emphasize historical context and LGBTQ social justice history, especially in the U.S.

English M104B African American Literature from Harlem Renaissance to 1960s Prof. Streeter

Introductory survey of 20th-century African American literature from New Negro Movement of post-World War I period to 1960s, including oral materials (ballads, blues, speeches) and fiction, poetry, and essays by authors such as Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Ralph Ellison.

English M105B Chicana/Chicano Literature from
Mexican Revolution to el Movimiento, 1920 to 1970s
Prof. Lopez

This course looks at the emergence of contemporary notions of chicanismo, or Chicana/o identity, asking what it means to be politically conscious and what role literature plays in that process. We'll survey significant works of Chicana/o literature from the middle of the last century, from the waves of migration following the Mexican Revolution through the consciousness raising of the Chicano Civil Rights Movement (el movimiento), thinking about the relationship between Mexican American politics and aesthetics, investigating how chicanismo continues to evolve in concert with the wider US civil rights movement.

English M105E
Queering Latinx Literature:
From Machismo to Feminism and Beyond
Studies in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature
Prof. Torres

This course is meant primarily as an introduction to US Latinx literary excellence. While many of our readings might not be explicitly queer, as we read across Latinx narrative forms--including stories, novels, memoir, and even some poetry--we will keep a particular focus on representations of gender, identity, sex and sexuality. Along the way we will look at other issues common to Latinx narratives as well, such as family, assimilation, authenticity, language, race, class, citizenship, and borderlands; all the fascinations and frustrations of the Latinx experience.

English M107A Women Writing Dangerous Women
Studies in Women's Writing
Prof. Stephan

This course will examine how British women writers develop and construct complex— even transgressive—female characters throughout the long nineteenth century. In the various literatures of the period, concerns about women's changing roles in culture and society gave rise to a wide range of representations of evil and destructive women. While both male and female authors employed the figure of the dangerous woman, our study of novels, short stories, and poetry by women writers will reveal their unique engagement and experimentation with this trope. Authors considered will include (but will not be limited to) Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Christina Rossetti, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and Vernon Lee.

English M107B The Renaissance Woman and her Daughters
Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Prof. McEachern

This course studies the genesis and development of a character type from a contradiction, namely, how the figure of the virtuous-yet-fallen, fallen-yet-graced, active-yet-passive, married-yet-chaste female protagonist of British literature emerges from the English Reformation and its central tension between the essential equality of all souls before God and the political necessity of female subordination. We will begin by exploring how this female figure emerges in the homiletic literature of the sixteenth-century (theology, martyrology, conduct books, history), and is re-imagined in heroines of Shakespeare, Spenser, Sidney and Milton. We will then undertake to examine the ways in which this type persists in the novels of Richardson, Austen, and Bronte. Concerns will include the shifting notions of literary character, the demands of form upon it (poem/play/novel), the role of the conditions of production and consumption of literature (from boy actors to the female audiences of novels); the influences of political and religious culture upon fiction (female queens to the angel in the house); the ways in which writers read their predecessors, and whether or how gender matters in that relation.

English 139.2 George Eliot's Middlemarch:
for Writers of Fiction and Students Who Read to Live
Individual Authors
Prof. Simpson

Virginia Woolf called Middlemarch "one of the few English novels written for grown up people." We will meet twice a week, to make our way through George Eliot's masterpiece, discussing the novel in 80 page increments.

On Mondays, we'll discuss the chapters covered in the old fashioned way, considering the old fashioned pleasures of reading. We'll ponder the great questions that arise, such as the perennially fascinating question in Middlemarch of how and why the two best people, who would no doubt end up marrying in Jane Austen, never feel any romantic interest towards each other at all.

Rebecca Mead lists the foundational questions of Middlemarch as:
- How is wisdom to be attained?
- What are the satisfactions of personal ambition, and how might they be weight against ties and duties to others?
- What does a good marriage consist of, and what makes a bad one?
- What do the young owe to the old and vice versa?
- What is the proper foundation of Morality.

In other words, on Mondays, we'll discuss the book as devoted readers at a book club.

On Wednesdays, though, we'll pull the chapters apart and try to understand HOW SHE DID IT, by way of looking at techniques, tools, research methods and her writing practice as revealed in biographies and letters. We will discuss all aspects of the writer's toolkit. For the professor, this is a driven labor: she's hoping to better understand the hidden structures and patterns of a great novel, so she can write her own masterpiece. Many young writers in the class may feel the same impassioned obsession. Those students who have no intention of ever writing a novel, will understand not only this book more deeply, but will also gain insight into the whole business of narrative trickery, storytelling and the way a work of art engages an audience. We will read the book as writers, assessing plots (charts will be made, timelines plotted and tinkered with), characterization, the proportion of narration to dialogue, the use of TELLING in addition to showing, the level of expository, essayistic writing. We will talk about how she manages time.

REQUIRED READING:

Middlemarch by George Eliot (as this book was written in English, any edition is fine.)

SUPPLEMENTARY READING

George Eliot, by Jennifer Unglow
George Eliot, The Last Victorian, by Kathryn Hughes
My Life in Middlemarch, by Rebecca Mead
"Middlemarch and Everybody," by Zadie Smith, p 29-41 in Changing My Mind.

You will be required to read, read, read, speak in class and perhaps bring tea and cookies. We will have surprise quizzes, required creative and critical papers, and oral reports.

English 145 The Virgin, the Wife, and the Widow:
Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent
Prof. Thomas

The category of the holy life offers a space for thinking through the relationship between the Church and holy women, between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, between rebellion and conformity. Ranging from the lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, we will focus on the ways in which the figure of the holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged the norms of the medieval Church by rebelling against and at same time conforming to them. We will close read the lives (Vitae) of such women (and a few holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues from virginity to marriage, from travel to enclosure. Questions for discussion include: What constitutes femaleness or masculinity? When do medieval notions of gender become consequential for saint-making? When is gender merely incidental? How do the figures of the rebel and reactionary enable female hagiography in a world otherwise known to be hostile to women?

NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ENGLISH 142 WITH THE SAME TITLE IN SPRING OR FALL, 2014, WITH PROFESSOR THOMAS.

English 161C
Approaches to the Novel
Novel in English to 1850
Prof. Nussbaum

This course will consider the emergence and development of the English novel. We will discuss the formation of the genre, the rise of realism, and fiction's intersections with romance and auto/biography. The texts we read will include an epistolary novel, a Gothic novel, a sentimental novel, an Oriental tale, and novels of manners. This period is known especially for women writers' entrance into the public marketplace, the growth of print culture, the rise of slavery, and the emergence of the British empire, all of which are reflected in its fictions.

English 177 Ethnic Comedy, Family Drama:
Interdisciplinary Studies in American Literature and Television
Interdisciplinary Studies of American Culture
Prof. Decker

This course examines the intersection of family and ethnicity as staged in TV comedy and literary memoir and melodrama. We survey the changing composition of the family––idealized and dysfunctional, from extended to nuclear to single-parent––as represented in fictional and nonfictional memoirs about racial segregation and immigrant life (Autobiography of Malcolm X, Portnoy's Complaint, Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen) and primetime sitcoms over the past sixty-five years (Father Knows Best, Amos n Andy, Goldbergs, Addams Family, All In the Family, Mary Tyler Moore Show, Good Times, Cosby Show, Simpsons, Black-ish, Fresh Off the Boat). We conclude by studying the recent appropriation and transformation of the popular Latin American telenovela in U.S.-made melodramatic TV comedies (Ugly Betty, Devious Maids, Jane the Virgin) and Chicana literature (Woman Hollering Creek and So Far From God). Theoretical essays will contribute to our understanding of novels and TV as distinct mediums as well as novel-reading and TV-watching as personal experience and social practice.

IMPERIAL, TRANSNATIONAL, AND POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES

English M105B   Chicana/Chicano Literature from
Mexican Revolution to el Movimiento, 1920 to 1970s
Prof. Lopez

This course looks at the emergence of contemporary notions of chicanismo, or Chicana/o identity, asking what it means to be politically conscious and what role literature plays in that process. We'll survey significant works of Chicana/o literature from the middle of the last century, from the waves of migration following the Mexican Revolution through the consciousness raising of the Chicano Civil Rights Movement (el movimiento), thinking about the relationship between Mexican American politics and aesthetics, investigating how chicanismo continues to evolve in concert with the wider US civil rights movement.

English 134 Lost at Sea in the Long Eighteenth-Century
Nationalism and Transnationalism
Prof. Charles

Shipwrecks, castaways, and magicians. Enslavement, rebellion, and abolition. These characters and concerns populate the (mostly) long-eighteenth-century texts we will examine through the critical lenses of nationalism and transnationalism. Particular focus on transatlantic mobility and how bodies of water promote the circulation of cultures, commodities, and human bodies. Our reading will cut across genres including romance, drama, oriental tale, poetry, novel, and autobiography. Primary texts may include The Tempest, Oronooko, Phillis Wheatley's poetry, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," and Mansfield Park.

English 166B                       American Literature, 1776 to 1832                   Prof. Colacurcio

Historical survey of American literatures from Revolution through early republic, with emphasis on genres that reflect systematic attempts to create representative national literature and attention to American ethnic, gender, and postcolonial perspectives.

GENRE STUDIES, INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES, CRITICAL THEORY

English 111A Hebrew Bible in Translation
Prof. Maniquis

Literary study of Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), with emphasis on literary devices and narrative structures in relation to Judaic historical, political, psychological, philosophical, and theological themes.

English 118B Documenting America:
Literature and Photography of the Great Depression
Literature and Other Arts
Prof. Lorhan


Few images define a decade like Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother" or Walker Evans's unflinching portraits of the Burroughs family do. In this course, we will analyze photographs taken by members of the Farm Security Administration and read them in conjunction with works of literature written during the Great Depression. Two collaborative projects between a writer and photographer, You Have Seen Their Faces (1937) by Erskine Caldwell with photographs by Margaret Bourke-White and Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941) by James Agee and Walker Evans, anchor the course. Both works document the plight of impoverished sharecroppers and tenant farmers whose personal tragedies become emblematic of a nation down on its luck. We will consider the ethics of documentary photography, the power dynamics between photographer (or writer) and subject, the interplay between text and image in the production of meaning, questions of artistry within a genre that purports to offer an unmediated view of reality, and documentary's connections to social reform movements. We will also examine how formal techniques employed by documentary photographers make their way into literature of the period as well as literary strategies involved in the framing and presentation of images. Texts for the course include John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath (1939), Zora Neale Hurston's Mules and Men (1935), John Dos Passos's The Big Money (1936), and Tillie Olsen's Yonnondio: From the Thirties.

English 119 Literary London: Tales of Two Cities
Literary Cities
Prof. Makdisi


For much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, London was a city with a split identity: broad fashionable boulevards and well-lit squares on the one hand, dark and teeming slums on the other; gentlemen and ladies claiming to be of the highest moral order on the one hand, and, on the other, an underworld of rogues, vagabonds, costermongers, prostitutes, pornographers, revolutionaries, conspirators, petty scribblers, ballad singers and outright criminals. This course will explore literary accounts of London's dual identity in this period and on into the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as the literary expressions of the gradual attempt to discover, map out, bring to order and settle the turbulent world of London: to tame and civilize the many resorts of vagabonds, thieves, and outcasts and to turn London into the fast-paced global metropolis that it is today. Readings will draw on a wide variety of sources, from canonical fiction, poetry and the visual arts to first-hand portraits of London streetlife, thieves' memoirs, detective stories, and on to contemporary fiction, graphic novels such as "From Hell" and "V for Vendetta," and zines including Laura Oldfield Ford's "Savage Messiah."

English 120          History of Aesthetics and Critical Theory          Prof. Reinhard


This course will study key texts and ideas in the history of critical and aesthetic theory, including works by Plato, Aristotle, Horace, Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche. Topics to be addressed include the struggle of philosophy and sophistry; classical ideas about poetic structure and genre; the social function of art; and modern concepts of aesthetic judgment, critique, and technology. This class is not a practical introduction to literary criticism, but an examination of theories about art and literature and their roles in human life and social transformation.

English 121 Modern and Contemporary Aesthetics and Critical Theory Prof. Huehls

This class examines literary theory and criticism in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will focus on three dominant theoretical movements--Marxism, structuralism, and psychoanalysis--but will also explore key concerns from more recent decades: feminism, biopolitics, race, and affect. Readings will include selections from Marx, Freud, Derrida, Lacan, Foucault, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, and Bruno Latour.

English 125   Violence in Cultural Theory and Literature       Prof. Maniquis

Examination of literary, philosophical, religious, and/or psychological texts that theorize causes, effects, political justifications, cultural sublimations, and literary uses and critiques of violence.

Students taking this course are strongly encouraged to enroll in the associated 2-unit adjunct course, English 110B, for winter quarter, 2017, with S. Burdorff (W 2-3:50pm). English 110B represents an addition to the English curriculum which provides students an opportunity to strengthen their writing skills while accruing additional units to meet graduation requirements in a timelier manner. Students who complete 2 separate sections of English 110B as majors in American Literature & Culture or English will be permitted to pair them to satisfy one elective requirement for their major.

English 129 Suspense, Crime, Mystery
Topics in Genre Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Critical Theory
Prof. Seltzer

This course will look at a series of novels, and some films, in examining the strange attraction between everyday reports of violence and a suspenseful modern world. Crime, mystery, and suspense are popular genres of a modern self-reporting world. The forms of art (literature and cinema) that show this lurid popularity can tell us a good deal about how we experience private and public life today. The focus will be primarily on the intersecting genres of suspense, crime, and mystery fiction. The challenge will be to read, or to look at, these fast-paced stories slowly and attentively. Readings may include novels by James M. Cain, Cormac McCarthy, Agatha Christie, Patricia Highsmith, Kazuo Ishiguro, Max Brooks, J. G. Ballard, and Tom McCarthy, among others, and related films. The course will require two 6-7 page papers, and the papers will require close reading and sustained interpretation. There may be a final exam. Attendance, participation, and on-time papers are required; no exceptions.

English 139.1 Faulkner
Individual Authors
Prof. Goodwin

The course focus is on the most creative and productive period in William Faulkner's career. The syllabus includes the novels The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Sanctuary, and Light in August; the stories "A Rose for Emily," "Spotted Horses," "Old Man," and those collected in Go Down, Moses; and an examination of Faulkner's work in Hollywood film. Course requirements are attendance, participation, midterm and final in-class examinations, and a five-page paper.

English 139.2 George Eliot's Middlemarch:
for Writers of Fiction and Students Who Read to Live
Individual Authors
Prof. Simpson

Virginia Woolf called Middlemarch "one of the few English novels written for grown up people." We will meet twice a week, to make our way through George Eliot's masterpiece, discussing the novel in 80 page increments.

On Mondays, we'll discuss the chapters covered in the old fashioned way, considering the old fashioned pleasures of reading. We'll ponder the great questions that arise, such as the perennially fascinating question in Middlemarch of how and why the two best people, who would no doubt end up marrying in Jane Austen, never feel any romantic interest towards each other at all.

Rebecca Mead lists the foundational questions of Middlemarch as:
- How is wisdom to be attained?
- What are the satisfactions of personal ambition, and how might they be weight against ties and duties to others?
- What does a good marriage consist of, and what makes a bad one?
- What do the young owe to the old and vice versa?
- What is the proper foundation of Morality.

In other words, on Mondays, we'll discuss the book as devoted readers at a book club.

On Wednesdays, though, we'll pull the chapters apart and try to understand HOW SHE DID IT, by way of looking at techniques, tools, research methods and her writing practice as revealed in biographies and letters. We will discuss all aspects of the writer's toolkit. For the professor, this is a driven labor: she's hoping to better understand the hidden structures and patterns of a great novel, so she can write her own masterpiece. Many young writers in the class may feel the same impassioned obsession. Those students who have no intention of ever writing a novel, will understand not only this book more deeply, but will also gain insight into the whole business of narrative trickery, storytelling and the way a work of art engages an audience. We will read the book as writers, assessing plots (charts will be made, timelines plotted and tinkered with), characterization, the proportion of narration to dialogue, the use of TELLING in addition to showing, the level of expository, essayistic writing. We will talk about how she manages time.

REQUIRED READING:

Middlemarch by George Eliot (as this book was written in English, any edition is fine.)

SUPPLEMENTARY READING

George Eliot, by Jennifer Unglow
George Eliot, The Last Victorian, by Kathryn Hughes
My Life in Middlemarch, by Rebecca Mead
"Middlemarch and Everybody," by Zadie Smith, p 29-41 in Changing My Mind.

You will be required to read, read, read, speak in class and perhaps bring tea and cookies. We will have surprise quizzes, required creative and critical papers, and oral reports.

English 153
London Theater
    Theatrical Renaissance: Early Modern Texts and Performances    
Prof. Braunuller

Shakespeare's plays were written in a highly competitive and collaborative theatrical environment. This class surveys the competition, from Christopher Marlowe to Ben Jonson and John Webster and John Ford. Topics include transvestism, same-sex romance, fraud, world-conquering, and much else. Familiarity with Shakespeare, early modern theatre buildings, and the "Industry" would be an advantage for class members.

English 161C
Approaches to the Novel
    Novel in English to 1850    
Prof. Nussbaum

This course will consider the emergence and development of the English novel. We will discuss the formation of the genre, the rise of realism, and fiction's intersections with romance and auto/biography. The texts we read will include an epistolary novel, a Gothic novel, a sentimental novel, an Oriental tale, and novels of manners. This period is known especially for women writers' entrance into the public marketplace, the growth of print culture, the rise of slavery, and the emergence of the British empire, all of which are reflected in its fictions.

English 164C Fantastic Journeys in the 19th-Century Novel
19th-Century Novel
Prof. Hollander

"It is far. But there is no journey upon this earth that a man may not make if he sets his heart to it." - King Solomon's Mines

During the rapidly accelerating technological advances in travel during the nineteenth century, travel became more accessible and also a point of enormous fascination. Adventure stories in places both real and fantastic dominated bestseller lists and captured a vivid part of nineteenth century imagination across the world.

The course will include works by Jules Verne, H. Rider Haggard, Lewis Carroll, Elizabeth Gaskell, L. Frank Baum, Edward Bellamy. We will follow their characters down rabbit holes, 20,000 leagues under the sea, through Wonderland, into the (imagined) future, to an African lost world, and across Oz. Political disturbances, changing economies, imperialist doctrine, and theories of the fantastic are topics we will address. Also, there will be lions.

English 169
Blake and Whitman
Topics in Literature, circa 1700 to 1850
Prof. Cohen &
Prof. Makdisi


This course is an introduction to two of the nineteenth century's most innovative and visionary poets: William Blake and Walt Whitman. Working comparatively, the course will situate each author in the volatile political contexts from which he emerged, the 1790s (Blake) and 1850s (Whitman), as well as the literary, cultural and political histories within and against which they wrote. Students will read through each author's major works and consider their relationship as well as their legacies on later traditions of experimental writing.

English 171C 20th-Century British Fiction
Prof. North

Survey of major British novelists and short story writers from 1900 to present.

English 173A American Poetry, 1900 to 1945 Prof. Stefans

This course provides an overview of what is generally known as the Modernist era of American poetry. A central focus of the course will be on the relationship of American poetry to trends in the visual arts (especially painting and film) and concurrent developments in European poetry and art. We start with a consideration of some French poetic trends that were hugely influential on American poets in the early 20th-century, namely Symbolism, the philosophy of Henri Bergson, and the rise of vers libre ("free verse"). From there, we will consider several of the major figures — Gertrude Stein, William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Marianne Moore, Mina Loy, and Robert Frost among others — as they relate to issues such as: Imagism, Dada, the "difficult" poem, the manifesto, the Harlem Renaissance, the African diaspora, verse narrative, continental philosophy, the rise of Fascist politics, and the influence of technology. Weekly writing assignments, including some creative (or re-creative) assignments, a mid-term and final paper.

English 177 Ethnic Comedy, Family Drama:
Interdisciplinary Studies in American Literature and Television
Interdisciplinary Studies of American Culture
Prof. Decker

This course examines the intersection of family and ethnicity as staged in TV comedy and literary memoir and melodrama. We survey the changing composition of the family––idealized and dysfunctional, from extended to nuclear to single-parent––as represented in fictional and nonfictional memoirs about racial segregation and immigrant life (Autobiography of Malcolm X, Portnoy's Complaint, Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen) and primetime sitcoms over the past sixty-five years (Father Knows Best, Amos n Andy, Goldbergs, Addams Family, All In the Family, Mary Tyler Moore Show, Good Times, Cosby Show, Simpsons, Black-ish, Fresh Off the Boat). We conclude by studying the recent appropriation and transformation of the popular Latin American telenovela in U.S.-made melodramatic TV comedies (Ugly Betty, Devious Maids, Jane the Virgin) and Chicana literature (Woman Hollering Creek and So Far From God). Theoretical essays will contribute to our understanding of novels and TV as distinct mediums as well as novel-reading and TV-watching as personal experience and social practice.


CREATIVE WRITING

Admission to all Creative Writing Workshops by application only. 

English 136.1           Creative Writing: Poetry
         
Creative Writing Workshop
Prof. Kevorkian


This is a free verse poem writing workshop, exploring the lyric in contemporary practice. Each class member writes and turns in one new poem each week for discussion. A portfolio of original poems made and revised during the quarter is due finals week. Also assigned are readings and craft exercises. Active participation is expected. Attendance at nighttime poetry readings may be required.

Admission to this class is only by instructor permission. To apply, please submit 5 poems by email no later than January 4, 2017, to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Also deliver hard copies of the same poems to Jeanette Gilkinson in the English department office in 149 Humanities. Include on both versions your email address, class year, other workshops taken, and any information you think pertinent. You will be notified by email by January 9 if there is a place for you in the class. A class list also will be displayed in 149 Humanities. Attendance at the first class on January 12 is required to be admitted to the course.

English 137.1             Creative Writing: Short Story
           
Creative Writing Workshop
Prof. Huneven

This class will be an intensive workshop on the reading and writing of short literary fiction.

We will consider the short story form, studying one or more great short stories weekly, which the students will be expected to read two to three times and annotate in an effort to understanding its magic and mechanics.

Students will write in-class exercises and will also write one short story every week at home. The teacher's primary goals in the class are 1) to help the students develop a regular practice of writing and 2) to foster and train technical skill. We'll work on revision and the development of a sound critical faculty. Emphasis will be on developing the student writer's voice and writing ability.

TO APPLY: Please submit 5 double-spaced pages of your fiction and tell me what workshops you've taken in the past. Also, please list your three favorite short stories and their authors. Mention the book you're reading right now. Also, please tell me your class standing (sophomore, junior, etc.)

If you are applying to both workshops and have a preference, please indicate that preference.

Submissions must be e-mailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. When e-mailing submissions, please put your last name and the course and section number in the subject line (example: Smith 137.1).

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN "137.1" IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE BY DECEMBER 16TH.

NOTE: A class list will be posted in English Department Office

Unfortunately, due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students' submitted work.

English 137.2        Creative Writing: Short Story
       Creative Writing Workshop
Prof. Torres

This class is an intensive workshop on the reading and writing of short fiction. We will consider the short story form, reading great short stories weekly, which students will be asked to study intensively and to reread. Students will write both shorter weekly stories, and two longer stories. The teacher's primary goal in the class is to help the students develop a daily practice of writing and to foster and train their ability to recognize what's best in their work. We'll also discuss revision and the development of a sound critical faculty.

To be considered for the class, please submit five pages (double spaced) of your fiction and tell me what workshops you've taken in the past. Also, please list your three favorite short stories and their authors. Mention the book you're reading right now.

If you are applying to both workshops and have a preference, please indicate that preference. Submissions must be e-mailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. When e-mailing submissions, please put your last name and the course and section number in the subject line (example: Rodriguez 137.2).

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN "137.2" IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE BY DECEMBER 16TH. 

NOTE: A list of students accepted into the class will be posted in English Department Office on Jan 4th.

Unfortunately, due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students' submitted work.

English 138.1           Screenplay Writing: Scene Study
          Topics in Creative Writing
Prof. Stefans


This workshop concentrates on how to write a scene for a film (or television show).

In the first week of class, we will review important elements of standard "Hollywood" feature-length screenplays, notably act structure, plot points, what a "beat" is, and creating a "hero." The first writing assignment will be to write, in prose, a very rudimentary act structure for a feature-length film.

After that, we will concentrate entirely on scenes. Students will be expected to write 5-7 page scenes weekly, formatted in screenplay style. Exercises will include writing:
• a short comedy sketch
• a scene that relies strongly on mise-en-scène (objects, space and other non-human elements)
• a montage sequence
• a scene that depicts a conversation as a "game of chess"
• a scene that represents the end of a major turning point within the context of the act structure
• a scene you write in collaboration with another student
Students must be willing to have their scenes read and/or acted out and be willing to participate in other writers' scenes. If time permits and students have basic film editing skills and are interested, we will also have a year-end short film assignment.

One or two sessions will involve visits from screenwriter/directors associated with NewFilmmakers Los Angeles (NFMLA).

No previous screenwriting or creative writing class experience is required.

To apply to this class: please send your submission to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Submissions must be in my inbox by midnight Wednesday, January 4th.

Your submission must include your student ID number, your year, your major and your previous creative writing classes. If you want, tell me a little about yourself in your email regarding your interests in writing, film (movies you love), acting, music (what you listen to and know) what you've studied, and other interests.

Most importantly, you must include a short 5-7 page scene IN SCREENPLAY FORMAT (i.e. in 12-point Courier with proper capitalization and indentations). It's recommended you use a free screenwriting program such as Celtx or Writers Duet. Submit the file as a PDF. There are many guides on the internet that review what proper screenplay format is — you should use one of them.

English 138.2        Writing the Television Drama Pilot
       
Topics in Creative Writing
Prof. Moyer


In this creative writing workshop, we'll practice the craft of writing popular television drama. Students will outline and write a first draft of their own TV drama pilot script over the course of the quarter. This is a challenge that will require participants to experiment with writing quickly and well but not perfectly, an issue of balance that we'll explore. Students will share their writing, perform each other's work out loud, and give and receive constructive feedback in our workshop meetings.

No previous critical or creative experience with TV writing, specifically, is needed for this workshop. English majors curious to learn more about writing in a pop-culture, commercial context (where "making great art" may not be the goal of the people paying the bills—a challenge even Shakespeare faced) are as welcome as aspiring TV writers.

To be considered, submit (1) a statement about why you want to take the class, what TV dramas you love, and why, along with your student ID, year, and major (also, if you are applying to both 138 workshops and have a preference, please indicate that preference); and (2) a 5-page narrative fiction writing sample. Samples of drama (for stage or screen) or prose (double-spaced) are fine. The most useful samples in either drama or prose will display potential through strong dialogue, well-motivated characters, striking visuals, and/or clear, propulsive plotting. Put both items into one PDF and e-mail it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with "138.2" included in the subject line. The deadline for submissions is January 4, 2017.

JUNIOR SEMINARS

Junior seminars may not fulfill the "Senior/Capstone Seminar" requirement for English and American Literature & Culture majors. They may, however, count toward the "2 English Electives" requirement.

English 180R The American 1890's
Junior Research Seminar
Prof. Dimuro

The seminar is organized around a sequence of progressive research exercises and written assignments intended to prepare students for advanced work in the field of professional literary studies. The course covers a range of approaches to literary and cultural research, including archival, literary critical, and theoretical to equip students with skills working with primary sources, secondary criticism, and online databases. The topic is American literature and culture of the 1890s, and may include literary texts by Edward Bellamy, William Dean Howells, Stephen Crane, Henry Blake Fuller, Jane Addams, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and others. Our objects of investigation include the architecture of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago skyscrapers, landscape architecture, urban space, the Ferris Wheel, and many other cultural and journalistic artifacts.

SENIOR ENGLISH CAPSTONES/SEMINARS

English 180 Native American Writing: Tribal Cultures Speak
Topics in Literature and Language
Prof. Lincoln

Who narrates the text, and what is the voice?
Where is the tribal perspective, and how do characters see their world?
Does the landscape speak? animals talk? ancestors whisper? spirits sing? trixters twist?
What is the cultural context of the text? historical placement? academic debate?
        current theory? street gossip? rez rap? student riff?
What makes this an Indian text, or not?

                   Do we ramble when we speak in tongues?—Sherwin Bitsui, Diné

We will meet weekly for discussions around the assigned text, addressing issues of what it means to be a Native American writer today. What are the tribal obligations, history, social patterns in the old days up to the present, evolving cultural beliefs, negotiations with the federal government and mainstream America? This heated debate includes the still persistent frontier racism, countered by a new desire to be an Indian and collect the cultural and financial benefits. The casinos have brought billions of dollars in resources to reservation Native Americans. They want to rebuild infrastructures, invest in education, return the natural landscape to native wetlands with wild animals thriving, project a future for tribal peoples as the base for American culture. Google Greg Sarris, one of our assigned writers and former student, then esteemed and infamous UCLA colleague, tribal chair of the coastal Pomo/Miwok for 28 years and a highly respected critic, environmentalist, educator, writer, Native leader and much admired public speaker.

Who and what and how does a tribal writer address a reading audience? How can this writer face contemporary issues without sacrifices of his cultural past? Who are this writer's guiding spirits? What is the cultural region, now and back in the beginnings, 60,000 years ago? What if this person is a multi-religious Christian and believes in many gods? What if the writer believes in no spirits or gods? How does this writer approach intertribal and interracial crossings? How does the writer educate non-Indians in tribal ways? Given the cultural and historical changes, the fact that 92% of all tribal peoples now live off reservation, the writer may have little cultural or religious connection with the old ways. The writer speaks and reads English, not the tribal tongue. To support his family this writer goes to work, buys brand new used cars, and watches football on weekends in the suburb. To raise her children and keep her home from the loan sharks, this woman does what she can, from cleaning houses to waitressing. Is this writer still an Indian, and what does the question signify? Why do we have to ask? What are the cultural differences between tribal ways and mainstream American self-help individualism?

Pick a tribe, research the history and environmental conditions now and long time ago, learn about the spiritual beliefs, social patterns, matriarchy or patriarchy (92% traditional matriarchies), explore intertribal allegiances and oppositions. Find out what the federal government did to this tribe, from Removal, to hemispheric genocide (Cotton Mather's 500 smallpox infested blankets as a peace token to the Algonkians and Columbus wiped out four million Caribbean Taino in four years with infectious diseases), to biological germ epidemics that destroyed 97% of 60 million Natives in the Western Hemisphere. Thousands were enslaved and brought back to Europe in chains, to be viewed by Anglos as curiosities, freaks, or savages. Witness Caliban in Shakespeare's The Tempest 1607.

What does it mean to be An Indian in White America today, as my Lakota brother or kola Mark Monroe titled his oral history of the off-reservation Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux? Where have we been, New World peoples, all immigrants, even aboriginal Natives crossing the Bering Straits thousands of years back? Where are we now and what do we write about and how do we write it? Where are we going?

Students will keep notebooks on their creative writing project, submit sample writing at mid-quarter, and turn in a finished paper of 15-20 pages at the end of the term.

Dok-sha, "so long, pay you back later, my people"—Professor Ken Lincoln

English 181C Religion and Critical Theory
Topics in Critical Theory
Prof. Kaufman

This course will examine the longstanding connection between religion and critical theory, providing a rough survey of the history of criticism through the lens of its profound engagement with monotheistic theology. We will pay particular attention to some of the more extreme moments in the theological tradition, those dealing with heresy, apostasy, and asceticism, and their connection to modern literature and philosophy.

English 182B The English Erotic Lyric: 1560-1640
Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature
Prof. Shuger

The class will begin with three weeks on the foundational discourses of early modern eroticism: Plato's Symposium; Ovid's Amores, Ars amatoria, and Heroides; and Petrarch's Rime sparse. We will then turn to the erotic lyrics of the English Renaissance (Sidney's Astrophel and Stella, Shakespeare's Sonnets, Donne's Songs and Sonnets, Spenser's Four Hymns, plus poems by Lodge, Herrick, Strode, et alii). The professor will lead the initial classes, but once we turn to the English poetry, students will be responsible for structuring the discussion and presenting the material. Each student will write a half-dozen short (1-2 pp.) papers, plus a concluding seminar paper of ca. 10 pp. Since this is a seminar, attendance and participation are required.

Note: none of this poetry is remotely pornographic, although some of it deals with subjects one might not wish to explain either to one's children or one's parents. But, in general, the only body parts to which reference is made are the heart and eyes. This is a course about eros, not libido.

English 183B     American Protest Literature
Topics in 19th-Century American Literature
Prof. Hyde

The word "protest" literally means to publicly testify. We often associate "protest" with images of collective demonstrations in the street, but the history of protest also is closely linked to another form of public testimony: the written word—in pen, print, and other mediums. This seminar introduces students to the traditions of American protest literature that developed out of one of the most tumultuous eras of US history, the period between the American Revolution and the Civil War. From heated philosophical debates about the nature and limits of political rights (Burke, Paine, Stanton) to the rise of new literary traditions centered on social justice (the slave narrative, abolitionist fiction, and the literature of reform)—the century that followed the American Revolution was a hotbed of political transformation as well as artistic innovation. Readings will include select legal documents and political philosophy, as well as longer works by writers such as Apess, Walker, Child, Thoreau, Douglass, Jacobs, Melville, Stowe, Whitman, and Susan B. Anthony.

English 184.1     Shakespeare's Sonnets, Longer Poems, and Their Tudor Contexts
Capstone Seminar
Prof. Braunmuller

Capstone Seminar

Consideration of most of Shakespeare's nondramatic writing in two broad contexts: comparable Tudor poems from Wyatt and Surrey through Sidney and Drayton, and forms in which those poems were published and consumed. Some literary history and some book history and some publishing history, all in one package. Students present at least one secondary text on a relevant subject, and write a 15- to 20-page paper making use of appropriate secondary criticism.

English 184.3 From Ancient Epic to Medieval Romance
Capstone Seminar
Prof. Jager

Capstone Seminar

We will read, discuss, and write about a series of works illustrating the transformation of the ancient epic into the medieval romance, with an emphasis on themes such as war, eros, justice, spirituality, the city or the kingdom, and the quest. Works considered change year by year but are typically drawn from the following list: Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid, Augustine's Confessions, Beowulf, The Song of Roland, Chrétien de Troyes' Lancelot, The Romance of the Rose, The Lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Sir Thomas Malory's Morte Darthur. Assigned work includes weekly reports and a (10-12 pp.) research essay due at the end, plus a ten-minute research report to the class at our final meeting.

Students must have completed all departmental requirements (major preparation + minimum four UD major courses) and also must have taken at least one of the instructor's upper-division lecture courses (e.g., English 140A - Chaucer, "Canterbury Tales"; or 141 - Early Medieval Literature).

Please contact the English Undergraduate Advising Office at (310) 825-1389 to enroll.

English 184.4 British Romantic Women Writers
Capstone Seminar
Prof. Mellor

Capstone Seminar

This seminar will attempt to define a distinctively "romantic" period in the British female literary tradition. Using approaches garnered from the new historicism, feminist theory and race theory, we will study the emergence of a new social construction of gender (of femininity and masculinity) in women's writing in England between 1790 and 1830, focusing on the relationship between gender, genre, history, and political ideology. We will analyze the ways in which a spectrum of women writers widely differing in class, race and political orientation dealt with such social issues as the rights of woman, marriage and motherhood, female sexuality, religion, revolution and social change, the slave-trade and the abolitionist movement. What political positions and literary practices do these women share? In what ways do they differ from and contradict each other? We will read major texts by Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Mary Prince, Felicia Hemans, Lucy Aikin, and Mary Shelley.

Required Texts

British Literature, 1780-1830, ed. Mellor / Matlak
Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and The Wrongs of
Woman, or Maria (Longman)
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (1818 Text) (Norton Critical Edition)
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (Norton Critical Edition)
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (Norton Critical Edition)
Jane Austen, Persuasion (Norton Critical Edition)
Mary Prince, History of Mary Prince (U of Michigan Press)

English 184.5 Pornography and the Politics of Sexual Representation
Capstone Seminar
Prof. Mott

As a capstone seminar, the course proceeds from the assumption that students will pursue an independent research project representing a culmination of their learning at UCLA. We begin with a study of Linda Williams's Hard Core from the perspective of researchers, reading to discover her process and methods as much as her argument. In the third week, students meet individually with the instructor to plot their research project. For the following five weeks, students post the results of their research to the course website, creating an archive for themselves and their peers. The postings scaffold the final project into "What's at Stake," "Critical Approach," and "Close Reading" entries. At the same time, class functions as a workshop in which students receive suggestions on their works-in-progress. During ninth week, we will conduct a round-robin editing workshop during which students will receive more pointed suggestions on a substantial piece of their project. In the final week, students present their nearly-complete project in a "mini-conference."

English 184.6 Stories Our Ancestors Tell:
History and Memory in Women's Poetry
Capstone Seminar
Prof. Rowe
 
Who we are and may become originates in our history, each uniquely personal by virtue of family of origin, ethnic heritage, gender, sexuality, spirituality, and individual talents and traits. Yet, by coming into the university, each of us expands our vision of the world both by coming to know oneself better and by learning to enter, curiously and respectfully, into the life stream of human beings different than ourselves and by focusing on the literary and artistic productions of diverse cultures. Language (oral and written) enables us to speak and name the self; stories link us in a chain of remembrance to a collective past. Through this cultural link, some writers claim an ethnic community, clan and tribal identity, continuity with the spirits, and a sense of the home (and land) where they learned to grow and flourish. For other writers, exiled from originary home(land)s by migrations, enslavements, internments, death camps, and urban violence, the search for connection to the communal past becomes a struggle to regenerate the self--through linguistic visions of new possibilities and newly forged identities. This seminar asks students to engage these issues of self-definition, history, and memory through the study of poetry and related essays.

In autobiographical writings, interviews, theoretical essays, and poetry by (primarily) American twentieth-century authors, such as Angelou, Anzaldúa, Atwood, Cervantes, De Leon, Harjo, Kalia, Kim, Klepfisz, Lorde, Suhair Majah, McElroy, Mirikitani, Mora, Plath, Rich, Rose, Rukeyser, Silko, Tapahonso, Thúy, Wong, and Walker (Margaret and Alice), women speak of growing up replete with memories, ancestral echoes, and resonant maternal voices. Each woman connects the present with the past, often by hearing stories transmitted by grandmothers and mothers who tell a collective history of family, homeland, and spiritual beliefs. By heeding truths gleaned from the ancestral past, each woman comes to know her "Self" and infuses her poetry with a unique vision and voice that makes lives, both old and new, into poetic memoirs.

Whether reading poetry or creating it, hearing stories or crafting them, drawing forth dreams of ancient lands, objects, and faces, or considering how the present self bears the imprint of earlier history, students are expected to be contributors and collaborators. This seminar engages students in learning to identify and celebrate their personal legacies of being and belonging. Each student will "adopt" a poet/poems as the basis for intensive study. Requirements will be a twenty-minute presentation, a short prospectus, a 15-page final critical paper or creative project (in two installments), and a cumulative poetry portfolio, as well as active participation in seminar discussions. Remember, Audre Lorde proclaims that "poetry is not a luxury" but rather the "skeleton architecture of our lives," which "lays the foundation for a future of change, a bridge across our fears of what has never been before."

English 184.7 Romantic Globalism
Capstone Seminar
Prof. Sanchez
 
During the nineteenth century, Britain emerged as the world's most expansive planetary empire with a sphere of influence affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of people and discrete communities. Although political historians are now seeking to understand the role of this vast empire in the development of a new global order beginning to take root in the nineteenth century, one of the main challenges for literary critics remains to determine the complex, and often vexed relations of global politics to the production of art, society, and culture at large. In this course we will seek to develop a greater understanding of British romantic literature as a global phenomenon. This means not only attending to the relationship of literary works to Britain's colonial enterprise—paying attention, for example, to the particular ways in which poetry, novels, drama, and other imaginative works helped shape, reinforce, and critique British imperial ideology—but also its role in more broadly shaping nineteenth-century global formations, including international law and thought, ideas about political boundaries and state sovereignty, economic liberalism, and the place of war and violence in maintaining peace throughout the globe. As a result, some of the topics to be discussed will include the relationship between romantic literature and the following: transatlantic and worldwide commercial systems, the slave trade, travel and exploration, foreign wars and political revolutions, and the collision of regional environments, especially with respect to religious and cultural conflicts. We will also attend to recent work on global feminisms, cosmopolitanisms, and "contact zone" experiences created by travel, migration, and Britain's colonial enterprise. While key critical works will help us establish these geo-political frameworks, we will also read literature about Other places—including Ireland, India, the Middle-East, Africa, North America, Latin America, and Spain.

English M191C Contemporary Asian American Short Fiction
Topics in Asian American Literature
Prof. Ling

This course examines a range of Asian American short fiction produced from the pre-WWII period to the present. Authors to be read include Toshio Mori, Bienvenido Santos, Carlos Bulosan, Hisaye Yamamoto, Wakako Yamauchi, Frank Chin, Milton Murayama, David Wong Louie, Bharati Mukherjee, Sylvia Watanabe, Russell Leong, Minh Duc Nguyen, David Yu, Han Ong, and Ken Liu, among others. The readings average 100 pages per week. Despite the seeming modesty of such weekly assignment, prior close engagement with the course material is prerequisite for participation in class discussions.

The grades will be based on the following: 1) an in-class oral presentation (10%); 2) a take-home midterm examination (30%); 3) a course paper of 12 double-spaced pages (60%); and 4) a required but not graded one-page, single-spaced weekly journal on the stories assigned. Starting from Week 2, I will introduce to the class one key literary concept per meeting (there are all together nine such concepts to introduce). We will devote approximately 10 to 15 minutes each time to fleshing out the meanings and commenting on the applicability of these concepts.

 

Courses