PeopleFaculty

Kareem, Sarah T.

Associate Professor

Humanities 214
Tel: 310.825.3745 / Fax: 310.267.4339 / E-mail

 

Education

B.A. Honors, English, 1996 Girton College, University of Cambridge

Ph.D., English, 2003 Harvard University

 

Interests

The history and theory of the novel; fictionality; Enlightenment philosophy; literature and science; realism and the marvelous; affect theory.

 

Selected Publications

Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Reinvention of Wonder. Oxford University Press, 2014.

“Flimsy Materials, Or, What the Eighteenth Century Can Teach Us about Twenty-First Century Worlding.” Critical Inquiry. (Winter 2016)

“Enlightenment Bubbles, Romantic Worlds.” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation. 56.1 (Spring 2015).

“Rethinking the Real with Robinson Crusoe and David Hume.” NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction. 47.3 (2014).

“Enchanted Enlightenment.” (Review of Jesse Molesworth, Chance and the Eighteenth-Century Novel: Realism, Probability, Magic.) NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction. 45.3 (2012). 502-505.

“Fictions, Lies, and Baron Munchausen’s Narrative.” Modern Philology 109.4 (May 2012). 483-509.

“Lost in the Castle of Scepticism: Sceptical Philosophy as Gothic Romance.Fictions of Knowledge: Fact, Evidence, Doubt. Eds. Yota Batsaki, Subha Mukherji, and Jan-Melissa Schramm. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. 152-173.

“Forging Figures of Invention in Eighteenth-Century Britain.” The Age of Projects. Ed. Maximillian E. Novak. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2008. 344-369.

 

Current Research

My first book, Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Reinvention of Wonder (Oxford University Press, 2014) offers a new account of the novel’s development that challenges the perception of the Enlightenment as hostile to marvel. With the support of a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, I am currently researching my second book, The Thread and the Shell, which is about two modes of attaching to literary works: following a thread and curling up in a shell.

http://www.sarahkareem.com/

http://blog.oup.com/2014/12/fiction-frankenstein-discomfort/