PeopleFaculty

Ling, Jinqi

Professor

Humanities 216
Tel: 310.206.5412 / Fax: 310.267.4339 / E-mail

 

Education

Ph.D 1992, Washington State University

M.A. 1982, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin, China.

 

Interests

Asian American prose fiction; literary periodization; genre studies; critical theory that concerns historicized aesthetics and the intersection between realism and modernism/postmodernism.

 

Additional Information

Jinqi Ling’s teaching and research focus on Asian American literary studies in light of significant cultural and theoretical debates that both register and go beyond the immediate concerns of the field. He is particularly interested in exploring the cognitive function of language, the referential conductions of literary output and its shifting modes of reception, and the question of what constitutes the contemporary literary avant-garde, both technically and politically, along these lines. His research method is chiefly informed by versions of Russian Formalism, the Saidian secular criticism, the problematic of the realism debate of the 1930s and its subsequent manifestations, and formally motivated ideological/cultural criticism. He is the author of two monographs: Narrating Nationalisms: Ideology and Form in Asian American Literature (Oxford UP, 1998) and Across Meridians: History and Figuration in Karen Tei Yamashita’s Transnational Novels (Stanford UP, 2012). He is currently completing a third book, titled Asian American Literature: A Reader’s Guide to Essential Criticism, for Palgrave Macmillan Press, while working on a book manuscript tentatively titled, “The Modern Temper: Early Asian American Prose Fiction and Its Formal Experiments, 1937-1968.”

 

Publications

  • Asian American Literature: A Reader’s Guide to Essential Criticism. London: Palgrave Macmillan Press, forthcoming.
  • “Asian American Short Fiction and the Contingencies of Form, 1930s to 1960s.” In The Cambridge History of Asian American Literature, edited by Rajini Srikanth and Min Hyoung Song, 187-202. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015.
  • “Speculative Fiction.” In The Routledge Companion to Asian American Literature, edited by Rachel Lee, 497-508. New York: Routledge Press, 2014.
  • Across Meridians: History and Figuration in Karen Tei Yamashita’s Transnational Novels. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2012.
  • “Forging a North-South Perspective: Nikkei Migration in Karen Tei Yamashita’s Novels.” Amerasia Journal 32.2 (2006): 1-22.
  • No-No Boy, by John Okada.” In A Resource Guide to Asian American Literature, edited by Stephen H. Sumida and Sau-ling C. Wong, 140-150. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2011.
  • Narrating Nationalisms: Ideology and Form in Asian American Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • “Identity Crisis and Gender politics: Reappropriating Asian American Masculinity.” In An Interethnic Companion to Asian American Literature, edited by King-Kok Cheung, 312-337. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
  • “Reading for Historical Specificities: Gender Negotiations in Louis Chu’s Eat A Bowl of Tea.” MELUS 20.1 (Spring 1995): 35-51.
  • “Race, Power, and Cultural Politics in John Okada’s No-No Boy.” American Literature 67.2 (1995): 359-81.