CoursesCourses for the English Major

The Department of English offers a wide variety of courses at the general and advanced levels. Courses are divided into the following sections:

0-99 Lower Division Courses (Freshman, Sophomore)
100-199
Upper Division Courses (Junior, Senior)
200 & above
Graduate Courses

Winter 2022

**Are you graduating in Spring or Summer 2022? Due to faculty availability, pre-1500 course offerings will be limited in Spring and Summer. Students planning to graduate during the next two terms would be well-served by completing their pre-1500 requirement THIS QUARTER.

Lower Division Courses in English (Freshman, Sophomore)

Critical Reading and Writing

English 4HW; English 4W

Introduction to literary analysis, with close reading and carefully written exposition of selections from principal modes of literature: poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Minimum of 15 to 20 pages of revised writing. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

This course fulfills a preparatory requirement for the English major. Please note that sections 1, 6, and 7 are reserved for Dept. of English majors and minors. All other sections are open to students of all majors.

English 4HW confers College Honors credit. Students participating in the College Honors program may contact a Dept. of English advisor to request a seat in the class.

 

Literatures in English, 1700 to 1850

English 10B / Prof. Kareem

Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required.

 

This course fulfills a preparatory requirement for the English major.

Different Times, Different Places

Literatures in English, 1850 to present
English 10C / Prof. Bristow

English 10C embraces a very broad range of literary works from 1850 to the present. The syllabus for winter 2022 includes poetry, drama, and prose fiction by African, American, British, and Irish writers. Titled “Different Times, Different Places,” the course explores writings by Frances E. W. Harper, Harriet Jacobs, Rebecca Harding Davis, Oscar Wilde, H. G. Wells, Virginia Woolf, Patrick Hamilton, James Baldwin, Tillie Olsen, Ama Ata Aidoo, Audre Lorde, Octavia E. Butler, Sarah Kane, Ocean Vuong, Edwidge Dandicat, Carmen Maria Machado, and Anthony Veasna So, among others.

 

This course fulfills a preparatory requirement for the English major.

Introduction to American Cultures

English 11 / Prof. Goyal

This course serves as a gateway to the American Literature and Culture major, examining the contested meaning of “America” itself as a national ideal, a diverse society, and a locus of cultural production. Our readings will cover a variety of time periods and a range of media, including fiction, poetry, visual art, film, and photography. The class centers on several keywords that define how the United States is imagined: borders, citizenship, ethnicity, slavery, and wealth. We will study established authors like Harriet Jacobs and F. Scott Fitzgerald, key figures in ethnic studies like Claudia Rankine and Jordan Peele, and newer writing by Ling Ma, Tommy Pico, and Valeria Luiselli. We will place a special emphasis on questions of identity, belonging, and movement, exploring the significance of national boundaries, regional alliances, and transnational flows of people, capital, and culture. By situating the study of U.S. culture in a transnational and interdisciplinary context, the course encourages students to think broadly and rigorously about the varied meanings of individual and collective identity, self-making, nationhood, and citizenship.

 

This course is a required preparation course for the American Literature and Culture major. Students in other majors may enroll for Foundations or Diversity credit.

Introduction to Creative Writing [APPLICATION REQUIRED]

English 20W / TA assignments pending

Designed to introduce fundamentals of creative writing and writing workshop experience. Emphasis on poetry, fiction, drama, or creative nonfiction depending on wishes of instructor(s) during any given term. Readings from assigned texts, weekly writing assignments (multiple drafts and revisions), and final portfolio required. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Enrollment by instructor consent and NOT by enrollment pass time: Interested students should apply by 8 pm on November 28. Applications received after this date will be considered only if additional space should become available and may not receive a full review or response. Enrollment preference for English 20W will be given to first and second-year students. Approved applicants will receive a PTE directly from the instructor.

To apply, please prepare a brief (no more than 250 words) note explaining why you wish to take this course, and what previous experience you have with creative writing courses (if any—none required!).

Applications may be submitted through our approved web form, which you can access HERE. Students applying to English 20W should enroll in an alternate course during their Fall enrollment passes, and should not assume that they will be admitted.

Please note that due to the volume of submissions, only students selected for the class will receive notification. Please do not email the instructors requesting status updates, as this will only delay the selection process. Questions should be directed to the English Undergraduate Advising Offices via MyUCLA MessageCenter.

Introduction to Visual Culture

English M50 / Prof. Sampson

Study of how visual media, including advertising, still and moving images, and narrative films, influence contemporary aesthetics, politics, and knowledge

Major American Authors

English 80 / Prof. Hyde
LECTURE PORTION ONLINE; DISCUSSION SECTIONS IN-PERSON

How has fiction shaped the way authors and readers imagine what it means to be an American? What role did fiction play in shaping competing visions of America in the aftermath of the American Revolution, when the U.S. did not yet have an established cultural identity or literary tradition? And what new meanings does literature hold for us today? This survey will introduce students to several American literary traditions—gothic literature, abolitionist literature, transcendentalism, romance, and realism—paying special attention to the way literature creates and reimagines the contested origins, identities, and meanings of “America.” We will read literature by Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, David Walker, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Lydia Sigourney, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Charles Chesnutt, and Toni Morrison.

Not open for credit to English majors.

Introduction to Poetry

English 91A / Prof. Dickey

An introduction to various verse forms and themes, and to the practice of poetic analysis.

Not open for credit to English majors.

 

Upper Division Courses in English

Practicum Courses

Please note that these are 2-unit courses. English majors may satisfy 1 English Elective if they take multiple 2-unit upper division English courses (courses must add up to a total of at least 4 units and must be taken for a letter grade). 

Westwind Journal

Undergraduate Practicum in English
English M192.1 / Prof. Wilson

This course is for the staff of Westwind, UCLA’s Journal for the Arts (www.westwind.ucla.edu). If you are interested in joining the Westwind staff, please familiarize yourself with the journal and plan to attend the first Winter quarter meeting.

UCLAPoem

Undergraduate Practicum in English
English M192.2 / Prof. Wilson

This course is for students in UCLAPoem ((www.instagram.com/uclapoem/). If you’re interested in reading and discussing published poetry, and in helping to plan and organize public poetry events and activities throughout the year, come

Elective-Only Courses

English major Electives may be selected from 5-unit upper-division English courses numbered 100 to M191E. Please note that the courses listed as “Elective-Only” may not be applied to Historical, Breadth, or Seminar requirements.

Writing in the English Major: Adjunct: 19th-Century Literature

English 110B / Prof. Vignola

THIS COURSE IS OPEN ONLY TO STUDENTS WHO ARE CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED IN ENGLISH 164C, 166C, 167B, 169.

Designed to help English and American Literature majors improve and refine their academic writing about nineteenth-century literature. Brings together students enrolled in designated base nineteenth-century literature courses in a workshop setting to advance their discipline-specific writing skills, especially the art of developing literary critical analysis and argument.

Writing in the English Major: Transfer Students

English 110T / Prof. Stephan

Open only to American Lit and English major transfer students who entered in Fall 2021. Improvement and refinement of writing about literature and culture. Focus on writing as process, rewriting, and nuanced argument; minimum 15 to 20 pages of writing required. Not open for credit to students who have completed English 110A.

 

TO ENROLL, PLEASE CONTACT THE ENGLISH UNDERGRADUATE ADVISING OFFICE VIA MYUCLA MESSAGECENTER.

 

This course qualifies as an elective for the Professional Writing Minor. 

Public Readers, Public Writers: Writing About Books for a 21st-Century Audience

English 110C / Prof. Kareem

What does it mean to engage in “public writing” or to be a “public intellectual? This course broadens students’ concept of what it means to write about literature by exploring the history and practice of writing literary criticism for a general (rather than for a specifically academic) audience. We’ll pay particular attention to the range of venues that have emerged for writers to publish their work for non-specialist readers. The course will include extensive opportunities for critical writing in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences, as well as building research skills for a variety of applications, including a culminating portfolio project.

 

This course qualifies as an elective for the Professional Writing Minor. 

 

Literatures in English Before 1500

**Are you graduating in Spring or Summer 2022? Due to faculty availability, pre-1500 course offerings will be limited in Spring and Summer. Students planning to graduate during the next two terms would be well-served by completing their pre-1500 requirement THIS QUARTER.

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

English 140A / Prof. Jager
ONLINE CLASS

We will read selections from Chaucer’s famous anthology of romances, comic stories, saints’ lives and cautionary tales as told by a motley crew — pilgrims on the road to Canterbury in the tumultuous 1380s amid threats of war, royal intrigue, popular revolt, and plague.  We will read the tales in Middle English, with regular quizzes and exams, a 2000-word research paper, and a required recitation of Chaucer’s 18-line proem to the General Prologue.

Chaucer, Springtime, and Plague

Later Medieval Literature-Research Component
English 142R / Prof. Fisher

Late medieval England was a time of rebellion, revolution, and (a small number of) heretics burned at the stake. Reading the springtime world of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, however, one would be hard pressed to know that medieval England was riven with political divisions, and struggling with crises of class, gender, and religious identities, alongside the relentless march of disease and medicine, technology and superstition, international trade and reactionary provincialism. What, then, are the histories that medieval English literature creates and obscures?

We will learn how to develop historical research questions, how to conduct research, and how to begin to answer those questions in substantial literary critical papers. We will be reading Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and selections of connected Middle English verse and prose to ask meaningful literary critical questions about the wider medieval world. There will be two papers: a 5-6 page paper and a final 20 page paper. Students will also make a formal 15 minute presentation on their research project during the second half of the quarter

The Virgin, The Wife, and The Widow: Dissent and Dominance in the Lives of Holy Women

English 145 / Prof. Thomas

The category of the holy life offers a space for thinking through the relationship between the Church and holy women, between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, between rebellion and conformity. Ranging from the lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, we will focus on the ways in which the holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged the norms of the medieval Church by rebelling against and at same time conforming to them. We will close read the lives (Vitae) of such women (and a few holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues from virginity to marriage, from travel to enclosure. Questions for discussion include: Why did holy women come to play increasingly dominant roles in the Middle Ages? What were ways in which they used their virginity or chastity to find agency within ecclesiastical structures designed to control their lives?

Literatures in English 1500-1700

Shakespeare: Later Plays

English 150B / Prof. Dickey

A study of selected later plays of William Shakespeare.

Shakespeare: Major Plays

Topics in Shakespeare
English 150C / Prof. Little

This course provides an upper-division introduction to Shakespeare’s plays by surveying a few of the plays we historically and contemporarily recognize as some of his most consequential plays.  Drawing on dramatic works from the entirety of his career, this course emphasizes the formal and historical properties of Shakespeare’s plays (and stage) and the ways Shakespeare’s plays continue to engage questions of race, gender, sexuality, and class, as well as questions of religion, philosophy, and politics. How all these questions are embodied, put into bodies, signals for our course the way Shakespeare’s dynamic poetry has become essential hallmarks for defining both the modern and the global.   Some of the possible texts for our course are A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and The Tempest.  Requirements for the course include class participation, a term paper, and a midterm and final exam.

Milton

English 151 / Prof. Shuger

Milton is the last Renaissance poet; his poetry, the culmination of the rebirth of Antiquity, both Classical and Christian, that began in Italy some three centuries earlier. Yet, if heir to the ancient traditions, Milton is also harbinger of what the dollar bill (look in your wallet) calls Novus Ordo Seculorum, the New Order of the Ages. Of the perhaps sixty paintings that encircle the walls of the New York Public Library’s reference room, hung in chronological order to compose a visual narrative of American history, two (the second and third) are of Milton. . . . The course will focus on the major poetry, especially Paradise Lost, but since Milton was a political thinker and a fairly important figure in the English Revolution, we will also read some of the key prose tracts, including his seminal defense of a free press. There will be two papers and ten quizzes, but neither midterm nor final.

 

This class meets both the 1500-1700 and VGP requirements.*

 

*very good poetry

Beauty in Early Modern English Poetry

Topics in Literature, circa 1500 – 1700
English 159 / Prof. Wagner

This course will examine early modern English poetic constructions of beauty. Reading sonnets, epyllia, and narrative poems by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Sidney, Greville, Spenser, and others, we will examine how poetic representations of beauty created normative expectations about race and gender, and how the English elite conceived of beauty within increasingly global contexts. We will examine visual materials, including early modern portraits and jewels, in order to help us consider the exchange value of sonnets within the English court’s gift culture. Readings will also include critical essays on race and gender and excerpts from travel narratives, scientific works, and early modern literary criticism.

 

Literatures in English 1700-1850

 

Barnaby Rudge

19th-Century Novel
English 164C / Prof. Grossman

Charles Dickens, the most famous author of the Victorian period, wrote two historical novels. One is very well known, and you may have heard of it: A Tale of Two Cities. That novel also depicts a very famous event: the French Revolution. The other historical novel that Charles Dickens wrote is called Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of ’Eighty. In this course, we are going to immerse ourselves in this other novel, in Barnaby Rudge—Dickens’s powerful and brilliant forgotten historical novel. The novel will serve us as a gateway for considering Victorian fiction. Barnaby Rudge contains breakthrough ways of writing about crowds, about urban unrest, and about historical prejudice. It seems concerned with an historical event long forgotten, an explosive week in London in 1780. In fact, the story slyly looks back, as we will explore, to another very famous revolution: the industrial revolution. Students will create and follow their own interests through this capacious novel, and they will author an original long essay about it. Please understand in advance that there is a heavy reading load in this course. Lively class participation is expected.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

American Literature, 1832 to 1865

English 166C / Prof. M. Gallagher

Historical survey of American literatures from Jacksonian era to end of Civil War, including emergent tradition of American Romanticism, augmented and challenged by genres of popular protest urging application of democratic ideals to questions of race, gender, and social equality.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

American Fiction to 1900

English 167B / Prof. Hyde
ONLINE CLASS

Sleepwalkers, romancers, unreliable narrators, disobedient subjects, and revolts at sea—nineteenth-century U.S. literature is as unruly as it is contemplative. The course will introduce students to the major movements of the period—sentimental literature, gothic fiction, reform literature, romance, and realism—paying special attention to literature’s broader role in shaping and reimagining the contentious cultural and political questions that animated the long nineteenth century. Readings will include works by Susanna Rowson, Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Lydia Maria Child, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, and Charles Chesnutt.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

The Gothic Imagination

Topics in Literature, circa 1700 to 1850
English 169 / Prof. Bistline

With its mysterious characters, unfamiliar settings, and suspenseful plots, Gothic literature has long horrified and tantalized readers. This course focuses on the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century fiction and poetry that pioneered Gothic conventions as well as essays from the same period that theorize this literature’s effects on readers. Besides mapping the formal and thematic features that define Gothic literature, we will trace Gothic texts’ connections to the fears and fads of the periods in which these texts were published. Topics of discussion may include these texts’ representations of fears about political revolution, the connection between the past and present, issues of gender, sexuality, and race, and the roles of the imagination and its connection to madness. In addition to exploring the ways in which Gothic literature uses its subversive content to comment on these issues, we will also look to the original material texts in which this literature was published. We will attend to the ways in which these texts blur the boundaries between fact and fiction and consider how these texts, including their illustrations, contribute to and mediate the Gothic’s themes.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

Literatures in English 1850 – Present

 

Queer Cultures: Narratives, Theories, Aesthetics

Queer Literatures and Cultures after 1970
English M101C / Prof. S.K. Lee

This course engages with various trajectories of queer literature and film, tracing the genealogies and meanings of “queer” and its affiliate terms: lesbian, gay, bisexual, nonbinary, and trans. Such terms will be approached not solely as the grounds of identity and subjecthood, but also as a way of reading, theorizing, narrating, and relating “queerly” to cultural objects and their movements across race, gender, ability, class, and geography. Texts and films in the course situate the study of queer culture and its political and aesthetic significance in relation to questions and critiques of normalization, embodiment, home and belonging, kinship, capitalism, colonialism, and nationalism. Writings and films by Alison Bechdel, Larissa Lai, Tommy Pico, David Wojnarowicz, Andrew Ahn, Cheryle Dunye, and Marlon Riggs will be included, among others.

Asian American Environmental Entanglements

Contemporary Asian American Literary Issues and Criticism
English M102B / Prof. Toy

This course explores Asian American environmental entanglements by focusing on recent works of fiction, multimedia, and poetry that situate ecological and bioscientific crises as the locus of cultural, political, and social conflict.  Although ecocriticism has historically overlooked Asian American literature and culture, Asian Americans have been preoccupied with the contested terrain of the US built environment since the first waves of immigration in the nineteenth century.  More recently, Asian American artists, filmmakers, and writers have voiced concerns about environmental issues ranging from climate change and species loss to factory farming and genetic modification.  Readings will include works by Chang-rae Lee, Ruth Ozeki, Rita Wong, and Karen Tei Yamashita among others.

 

This course is eligible for credit on the Literature and the Environment minor.

African American Literature from Harlem Renaissance to 1960s

English M104B / Prof. Streeter

Introductory survey of 20th-century African American literature from New Negro Movement of post-World War I period to 1960s, including oral materials (ballads, blues, speeches) and fiction, poetry, and essays by authors such as Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Ralph Ellison

“In the Heart of the Hibernian Metropolis”: Literary Dublin

Literary Cities
English 119 / Prof. Jaurretche
ONLINE CLASS

Using the city of Dublin as our locus, students in this course will read a variety of major works written by Dublin writers. A grounding in Dublin geography, urban study, and history will prepare students to consider various dimensions of Irish experience in the twentieth-century, from its status as a country under British rule through its fight for independence, and ultimate autonomy. This course is designed as a hybrid, with some content delivered via our learning management system.  The lectures are weekly, and in person.  We will use our class time together for discussion.  A feature of this class is team research and annotation of digitized archival and historical items for publication as a Field Guide.

Henry James

Individual Authors
English 139 / Prof. Dimuro

Henry James (1843-1916) wrote essays, reviews, autobiographies, criticism, plays, and travel narratives, but it is primarily his achievements in prose fiction that we will study. We will cover James’s work from his first popular success Daisy Miller (1878) to one of his later, most complex novels, The Ambassadors (1903). The course covers the great realist novels of James’s middle career such as The Portrait of a Lady (1880-1881) and The Bostonians (1886). We will also consider James’s aesthetic theory in his landmark essay “The Art of Fiction” (1884) and read a number of the “Prefaces” he wrote for the 1909 New York edition of his works. We will read some of James’s famous tales and short stories such as “The Pupil” (1891) and “The Beast in the Jungle” (1903), as well as other stories from the 1890s that usher in James’s so-called “late” style. We also read The Spoils of Poynton (1897), a study in greed and possession that represents James’s return to writing fiction after an unsuccessful turn as a dramatist for the London stage. We will also consider the “international theme,” the issue of child abuse, gender and sexuality, renunciation, social ideology, psychological realism, and other related topics.

Barnaby Rudge

19th-Century Novel
English 164C / Prof. Grossman

Charles Dickens, the most famous author of the Victorian period, wrote two historical novels. One is very well known, and you may have heard of it: A Tale of Two Cities. That novel also depicts a very famous event: the French Revolution. The other historical novel that Charles Dickens wrote is called Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of ’Eighty. In this course, we are going to immerse ourselves in this other novel, in Barnaby Rudge—Dickens’s powerful and brilliant forgotten historical novel. The novel will serve us as a gateway for considering Victorian fiction. Barnaby Rudge contains breakthrough ways of writing about crowds, about urban unrest, and about historical prejudice. It seems concerned with an historical event long forgotten, an explosive week in London in 1780. In fact, the story slyly looks back, as we will explore, to another very famous revolution: the industrial revolution. Students will create and follow their own interests through this capacious novel, and they will author an original long essay about it. Please understand in advance that there is a heavy reading load in this course. Lively class participation is expected.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

American Fiction to 1900

English 167B / Prof. Hyde
ONLINE CLASS

Sleepwalkers, romancers, unreliable narrators, disobedient subjects, and revolts at sea—nineteenth-century U.S. literature is as unruly as it is contemplative. The course will introduce students to the major movements of the period—sentimental literature, gothic fiction, reform literature, romance, and realism—paying special attention to literature’s broader role in shaping and reimagining the contentious cultural and political questions that animated the long nineteenth century. Readings will include works by Susanna Rowson, Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Lydia Maria Child, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, and Charles Chesnutt.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

American Literature, 1865 to 1900

English 170A / Prof. Colacurcio

Historical survey of American literature from end of Civil War to beginning of 20th century, including writers such as Howells, James, Twain, Norris, Dickinson, Crane, Chesnutt, Gilman, and others working in modes of realist and naturalist novel, regional and vernacular prose, and poetry.

Contemporary American Poetry

English 173C / Prof. Mullen

Description coming soon.

American Fiction since 1945

English 174B / Prof. Perez-Torres

This course will consider novels, poetry, and short stories whose fictional worlds help reveal the contradictions, problems, and potential of a nation at change in the epoch following World War II which, with its Nazi death machines and the US nuclear horrors, proved traumatic in world history. Two convulsive reactions subsequently occurred in the US. One sought comfort: structuring differences and definitions, marking national, racial, sexual, and class boundaries. The other reaction was to embrace change that addresses profound historical injustices. This course will consider novels, poetry, and short stories whose fictional worlds help reveal the contradictions, problems, and potential of a nation at change. In the process, we will focus on precise textual and literary analyses. The goals of the class will be: 1) to express oneself in a clear and organized way; 2) to analyze literary material critically; 3) to generate original ideas from a synthesis of different critical thoughts and analyses and, 4) to consider how post-war socio-political dynamics establish the patterns for modern life today.

Ethnic Comedy, Family Drama: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Television

Interdisciplinary Studies of American Culture
English 177 / Prof. Decker

We examine the intersection of family and ethnicity as staged in comedy and drama in order to consider how literary and TV expressions of laughter, love, and emotional conflict have both reinforced the nuclear family ideal and challenged it by reimagining the American family variously (as single-parent and female-headed; as multi-generational and ethnic). We ask if there’s more to comedy than how many times it makes you laugh, or if accounting for changing times and mores can somehow compensate for jokes that age badly. Situation comedies include Father Knows Best, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Fresh Off the Boat, and Black-ish; TV dramedies include Desperate Housewives, Devious Maids, and Louie. Dramatic fiction and autobiography (The Godfather, The Woman Warrior, Autobiography of Malcolm X) will be paired with comic novels (Portnoy’s Complaint, Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen, The Sellout). Telenovela-inspired Chicana literature (Caramelo and So Far from God) will be read alongside TV dramedies adapted from Latin American telenovelas (Ugly Betty and Jane the Virgin).

Modernism

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to present
English 179.1 / Prof. Hornby

In this course we will investigate the forms and cultures of British modernism, paying attention to the development of literary modernism in the context of the political, social, and environmental disintegration and upheaval that marked the twentieth century. We will consider works by Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Jean Rhys, W. B. Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Zoë Wicomb, and Ali Smith. Among our questions: what was modernism? How and why do we read modernist literature? Why is modernist literature difficult? What are the central concerns of modernist authors? Are there still modernists?

Reading Like a Writer: A Short Story Intensive

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to present
English 179.2 / Prof. Huneven

In this class, we will learn to read short stories with a writer’s eye to enlarge our understanding of that difficult, capacious form and thus enrich our own fiction writing. Students will read around 20 assigned stories, each at least three times: once for pleasure, once critically, and once more, to approach the deep, familiarity in which we begin to glimpse the writer at work, making decisions and solving problems. We will also turn to noted contemporary practitioners of the form to see how they analyze stories to learn from them. Students will present assigned stories for class discussion. Midterm exam. Final project can be creative with instructor’s permission.

British Fiction since 1945

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to present
English 179.3/ Prof. North

A survey of British fiction since 1945. How does British fiction change as Britain ceases to be the center of a worldwide empire and becomes smaller and more ingrown but also vastly more diverse? How do these historical changes affect the traditional structures of the novel and even the English language itself?

Novel Technologies

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to Present
English 179.4 / Prof. Seltzer

This course will examine how recent novels depict and enact how we live in and with technologies today.  We will focus on technologies of everyday life—from systems of body and message transport, to exercise machines and circuit training, to work routines and assisted intelligence.  The emphasis will be on how genres of the contemporary novel, and some visual narratives, both outline and induce our intimacy with machines, and so frame the paradoxes and forms of life that produces.

 

Gender, Race, Ethnicity, Disability, and Sexuality Studies

Queer Cultures: Narratives, Theories, Aesthetics

Queer Literatures and Cultures after 1970
English M101C / Prof. S.K. Lee

This course engages with various trajectories of queer literature and film, tracing the genealogies and meanings of “queer” and its affiliate terms: lesbian, gay, bisexual, nonbinary, and trans. Such terms will be approached not solely as the grounds of identity and subjecthood, but also as a way of reading, theorizing, narrating, and relating “queerly” to cultural objects and their movements across race, gender, ability, class, and geography. Texts and films in the course situate the study of queer culture and its political and aesthetic significance in relation to questions and critiques of normalization, embodiment, home and belonging, kinship, capitalism, colonialism, and nationalism. Writings and films by Alison Bechdel, Larissa Lai, Tommy Pico, David Wojnarowicz, Andrew Ahn, Cheryle Dunye, and Marlon Riggs will be included, among others.

Asian American Environmental Entanglements

Contemporary Asian American Literary Issues and Criticism
English M102B / Prof. Toy

This course explores Asian American environmental entanglements by focusing on recent works of fiction, multimedia, and poetry that situate ecological and bioscientific crises as the locus of cultural, political, and social conflict.  Although ecocriticism has historically overlooked Asian American literature and culture, Asian Americans have been preoccupied with the contested terrain of the US built environment since the first waves of immigration in the nineteenth century.  More recently, Asian American artists, filmmakers, and writers have voiced concerns about environmental issues ranging from climate change and species loss to factory farming and genetic modification.  Readings will include works by Chang-rae Lee, Ruth Ozeki, Rita Wong, and Karen Tei Yamashita among others.

 

This course is eligible for credit on the Literature and the Environment minor.

African American Literature from Harlem Renaissance to 1960s

English M104B / Prof. Streeter

Introductory survey of 20th-century African American literature from New Negro Movement of post-World War I period to 1960s, including oral materials (ballads, blues, speeches) and fiction, poetry, and essays by authors such as Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Ralph Ellison

Indigenous Literatures of North America

Studies in Native American and Indigenous Literatures
English 106 / Prof. Mo’e’hahne

In this course, we will be introduced to the Indigenous literatures of North America by reading fiction and poetry. We will consider how authors imagine Indigenous lifeworlds, affective and embodied experiences, and genders and sexualities in ways that index and transcend historic and ongoing settler-imperial violence. Our texts will focus on writers who Indigenous to the geographies that are claimed and occupied by the United States and Canadian settler colonies. We will examine authors craft decolonial forms of memory, intergenerational connection, and relationships with more-than-human life. Listening to and thinking with these writers, we will ask, how do Indigenous literatures represent significant spaces of cultural, ecological, feminist, and queer theorizing with the power to enact a decolonial present and future?

CLASS CANCELLED (Race, Gender, and Intimacy in Women’s Gothic Literature)

Studies in Women’s Writing
English M107A / Prof. Dembowitz

Class cancelled.

Making Place, Making Race**

Topics in Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
English 109 / Prof. Fosbury

Race, as we know it today, was not inevitable. It is, as the historian Gerald Horne has argued, a co-production of settler colonialism and globalized capitalism. In this course, we will investigate how race was imagined, disseminated, and enforced in colonial writings about place and geography in the seventeenth-century Americas. We will conclude by examining how these ideas have been challenged and contested in the long anticolonial traditions of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

 

**This course qualifies as a pre-1848 course for American Literature and Culture majors. It will be restricted to American Literature and Culture majors on first pass, and will open up to English majors on second pass.

Keywords in Theory: Queer / Feminism

English 122 / Prof. R. Lee

This course has three aims: 1) to expose students to several genres of feminist theory using a more or less traditional chronological ordering; 2) to outline the challenges to that linear chronology in relation to different feminist movements, practices, and concepts that center e.g. women of color, working class women, indigenous women, as well as the linguistic turn (the effects of deconstruction and poststructuralism); and 3) to introduce contemporary convergences of feminist topics with subject matter in science and technology studies, posthuman multispecies ecology, and thing theory/new materialism.

 

This course qualifies as a critical theory course for students planning to pursue departmental honors.

Beauty in Early Modern English Poetry

Topics in Literature, circa 1500 to 1700
English 159 / Prof. Wagner

This course will examine early modern English poetic constructions of beauty. Reading sonnets, epyllia, and narrative poems by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Sidney, Greville, Spenser, and others, we will examine how poetic representations of beauty created normative expectations about race and gender, and how the English elite conceived of beauty within increasingly global contexts. We will examine visual materials, including early modern portraits and jewels, in order to help us consider the exchange value of sonnets within the English court’s gift culture. Readings will also include critical essays on race and gender and excerpts from travel narratives, scientific works, and early modern literary criticism.

Ethnic Comedy, Family Drama: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Television

Interdisciplinary Studies of American Culture
English 177 / Prof. Decker

We examine the intersection of family and ethnicity as staged in comedy and drama in order to consider how literary and TV expressions of laughter, love, and emotional conflict have both reinforced the nuclear family ideal and challenged it by reimagining the American family variously (as single-parent and female-headed; as multi-generational and ethnic). We ask if there’s more to comedy than how many times it makes you laugh, or if accounting for changing times and mores can somehow compensate for jokes that age badly. Situation comedies include Father Knows Best, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Fresh Off the Boat, and Black-ish; TV dramedies include Desperate Housewives, Devious Maids, and Louie. Dramatic fiction and autobiography (The Godfather, The Woman Warrior, Autobiography of Malcolm X) will be paired with comic novels (Portnoy’s Complaint, Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen, The Sellout). Telenovela-inspired Chicana literature (Caramelo and So Far from God) will be read alongside TV dramedies adapted from Latin American telenovelas (Ugly Betty and Jane the Virgin).

 

Imperial, Transnational, and Postcolonial Studies

 

Indigenous Literatures of North America

Studies in Native American and Indigenous Literatures
English 106 / Prof. Mo’e’hahne

In this course, we will be introduced to the Indigenous literatures of North America by reading fiction and poetry. We will consider how authors imagine Indigenous lifeworlds, affective and embodied experiences, and genders and sexualities in ways that index and transcend historic and ongoing settler-imperial violence. Our texts will focus on writers who Indigenous to the geographies that are claimed and occupied by the United States and Canadian settler colonies. We will examine authors craft decolonial forms of memory, intergenerational connection, and relationships with more-than-human life. Listening to and thinking with these writers, we will ask, how do Indigenous literatures represent significant spaces of cultural, ecological, feminist, and queer theorizing with the power to enact a decolonial present and future?

Making Place, Making Race**

Topics in Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
English 109 / Prof. Fosbury

Race, as we know it today, was not inevitable. It is, as the historian Gerald Horne has argued, a co-production of settler colonialism and globalized capitalism. In this course, we will investigate how race was imagined, disseminated, and enforced in colonial writings about place and geography in the seventeenth-century Americas. We will conclude by examining how these ideas have been challenged and contested in the long anticolonial traditions of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

 

**This course qualifies as a pre-1848 course for American Literature and Culture majors. It will be restricted to American Literature and Culture majors on first pass, and will open up to English majors on second pass.

Orientalism and Occidentalism

Culture & Imperialism
English 132 / Prof. Makdisi

This class will explore the racial dynamics of empire as well as the relationships between race and national identity both inside and outside Britain, and their implications for 19th and 20th century British literature.  We will pay particular attention to the ways in which initially unstable concepts of race and national identity gradually came to be redefined as notions of whiteness, Englishness and a sense of being Western were gradually consolidated through this period. We will pay particular attention to the emergence of the concept of Orientalism and its reciprocal notion, Occidentalism. Readings will draw on the work of writers such as Edward Said, Mary Wollstonecraft, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Charles Dickens and others.

 

Genre Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Critical Theory

 

CLASS CANCELLED (Race, Gender, and Intimacy in Women’s Gothic Literature)

Studies in Women’s Writing
English M107A / Prof. Dembowitz

Class cancelled.

“In the Heart of the Hibernian Metropolis”: Literary Dublin

Literary Cities
English 119 / Prof. Jaurretche
ONLINE CLASS

Using the city of Dublin as our locus, students in this course will read a variety of major works written by Dublin writers. A grounding in Dublin geography, urban study, and history will prepare students to consider various dimensions of Irish experience in the twentieth-century, from its status as a country under British rule through its fight for independence, and ultimate autonomy. This course is designed as a hybrid, with some content delivered via our learning management system.  The lectures are weekly, and in person.  We will use our class time together for discussion.  A feature of this class is team research and annotation of digitized archival and historical items for publication as a Field Guide.

Keywords in Theory: Queer / Feminism

English 122 / Prof. R. Lee

This course has three aims: 1) to expose students to several genres of feminist theory using a more or less traditional chronological ordering; 2) to outline the challenges to that linear chronology in relation to different feminist movements, practices, and concepts that center e.g. women of color, working class women, indigenous women, as well as the linguistic turn (the effects of deconstruction and poststructuralism); and 3) to introduce contemporary convergences of feminist topics with subject matter in science and technology studies, posthuman multispecies ecology, and thing theory/new materialism.

 

This course qualifies as a critical theory course for students planning to pursue departmental honors.

Henry James

Individual Authors
English 139 / Prof. Dimuro

Henry James (1843-1916) wrote essays, reviews, autobiographies, criticism, plays, and travel narratives, but it is primarily his achievements in prose fiction that we will study. We will cover James’s work from his first popular success Daisy Miller (1878) to one of his later, most complex novels, The Ambassadors (1903). The course covers the great realist novels of James’s middle career such as The Portrait of a Lady (1880-1881) and The Bostonians (1886). We will also consider James’s aesthetic theory in his landmark essay “The Art of Fiction” (1884) and read a number of the “Prefaces” he wrote for the 1909 New York edition of his works. We will read some of James’s famous tales and short stories such as “The Pupil” (1891) and “The Beast in the Jungle” (1903), as well as other stories from the 1890s that usher in James’s so-called “late” style. We also read The Spoils of Poynton (1897), a study in greed and possession that represents James’s return to writing fiction after an unsuccessful turn as a dramatist for the London stage. We will also consider the “international theme,” the issue of child abuse, gender and sexuality, renunciation, social ideology, psychological realism, and other related topics.

Barnaby Rudge

19th-Century Novel
English 164C / Prof. Grossman

Charles Dickens, the most famous author of the Victorian period, wrote two historical novels. One is very well known, and you may have heard of it: A Tale of Two Cities. That novel also depicts a very famous event: the French Revolution. The other historical novel that Charles Dickens wrote is called Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of ’Eighty. In this course, we are going to immerse ourselves in this other novel, in Barnaby Rudge—Dickens’s powerful and brilliant forgotten historical novel. The novel will serve us as a gateway for considering Victorian fiction. Barnaby Rudge contains breakthrough ways of writing about crowds, about urban unrest, and about historical prejudice. It seems concerned with an historical event long forgotten, an explosive week in London in 1780. In fact, the story slyly looks back, as we will explore, to another very famous revolution: the industrial revolution. Students will create and follow their own interests through this capacious novel, and they will author an original long essay about it. Please understand in advance that there is a heavy reading load in this course. Lively class participation is expected.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

American Fiction to 1900

English 167B / Prof. Hyde
ONLINE CLASS

Sleepwalkers, romancers, unreliable narrators, disobedient subjects, and revolts at sea—nineteenth-century U.S. literature is as unruly as it is contemplative. The course will introduce students to the major movements of the period—sentimental literature, gothic fiction, reform literature, romance, and realism—paying special attention to literature’s broader role in shaping and reimagining the contentious cultural and political questions that animated the long nineteenth century. Readings will include works by Susanna Rowson, Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Lydia Maria Child, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, and Charles Chesnutt.

 

Students enrolled in this course are eligible to earn 2 additional units of upper-division credit by enrolling in English 110B: Writing about 19th-Century Literature.

Contemporary American Poetry

English 173C / Prof. Mullen

Description coming soon.

American Fiction since 1945

English 174B / Prof. Perez-Torres

This course will consider novels, poetry, and short stories whose fictional worlds help reveal the contradictions, problems, and potential of a nation at change in the epoch following World War II which, with its Nazi death machines and the US nuclear horrors, proved traumatic in world history. Two convulsive reactions subsequently occurred in the US. One sought comfort: structuring differences and definitions, marking national, racial, sexual, and class boundaries. The other reaction was to embrace change that addresses profound historical injustices. This course will consider novels, poetry, and short stories whose fictional worlds help reveal the contradictions, problems, and potential of a nation at change. In the process, we will focus on precise textual and literary analyses. The goals of the class will be: 1) to express oneself in a clear and organized way; 2) to analyze literary material critically; 3) to generate original ideas from a synthesis of different critical thoughts and analyses and, 4) to consider how post-war socio-political dynamics establish the patterns for modern life today.

Ethnic Comedy, Family Drama: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Television

Interdisciplinary Studies of American Culture
English 177 / Prof. Decker

We examine the intersection of family and ethnicity as staged in comedy and drama in order to consider how literary and TV expressions of laughter, love, and emotional conflict have both reinforced the nuclear family ideal and challenged it by reimagining the American family variously (as single-parent and female-headed; as multi-generational and ethnic). We ask if there’s more to comedy than how many times it makes you laugh, or if accounting for changing times and mores can somehow compensate for jokes that age badly. Situation comedies include Father Knows Best, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Fresh Off the Boat, and Black-ish; TV dramedies include Desperate Housewives, Devious Maids, and Louie. Dramatic fiction and autobiography (The Godfather, The Woman Warrior, Autobiography of Malcolm X) will be paired with comic novels (Portnoy’s Complaint, Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen, The Sellout). Telenovela-inspired Chicana literature (Caramelo and So Far from God) will be read alongside TV dramedies adapted from Latin American telenovelas (Ugly Betty and Jane the Virgin).

Modernism

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to present
English 179.1 / Prof. Hornby

In this course we will investigate the forms and cultures of British modernism, paying attention to the development of literary modernism in the context of the political, social, and environmental disintegration and upheaval that marked the twentieth century. We will consider works by Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Jean Rhys, W. B. Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Zoë Wicomb, and Ali Smith. Among our questions: what was modernism? How and why do we read modernist literature? Why is modernist literature difficult? What are the central concerns of modernist authors? Are there still modernists?

Reading Like a Writer: A Short Story Intensive

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to present
English 179.2 / Prof. Huneven

In this class, we will learn to read short stories with a writer’s eye to enlarge our understanding of that difficult, capacious form and thus enrich our own fiction writing. Students will read around 20 assigned stories, each at least three times: once for pleasure, once critically, and once more, to approach the deep, familiarity in which we begin to glimpse the writer at work, making decisions and solving problems. We will also turn to noted contemporary practitioners of the form to see how they analyze stories to learn from them. Students will present assigned stories for class discussion. Midterm exam. Final project can be creative with instructor’s permission.

British Fiction since 1945

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to present
English 179.3/ Prof. North

A survey of British fiction since 1945. How does British fiction change as Britain ceases to be the center of a worldwide empire and becomes smaller and more ingrown but also vastly more diverse? How do these historical changes affect the traditional structures of the novel and even the English language itself?

Novel Technologies

Topics in Literature, circa 1850 to Present
English 179.4 / Prof. Seltzer

This course will examine how recent novels depict and enact how we live in and with technologies today.  We will focus on technologies of everyday life—from systems of body and message transport, to exercise machines and circuit training, to work routines and assisted intelligence.  The emphasis will be on how genres of the contemporary novel, and some visual narratives, both outline and induce our intimacy with machines, and so frame the paradoxes and forms of life that produces.

 

Creative Writing Workshops

Admission to most Creative Writing Workshops is by application only.

 

Creative Writing: Poetry

English 136.1 / Prof. Mullen

Course Description:

In this creative writing workshop, students write original poems, a new poem each week, and post weekly drafts for class discussion. Each student also contributes constructive feedback to fellow writers, and makes an oral presentation on the work of a published poet. Criteria for grading include regular and punctual attendance and completion of assignments, participation in discussion with respectful critique of fellow writers, as well as a final portfolio of revised poems. Enrollment is by instructor consent.

 

How to Apply:

To apply for enrollment, please submit five poems you have written, along with a brief statement about your interest in reading and writing poetry and your previous experience in literature and creative writing courses. Please include your 9-digit UID number and e-mail address when you send your submission to mullen@humnet.ucla.edu and creativewriting@english.ucla.edu.

If you are applying to more than one workshop and have a preference, please indicate that preference so we can try to accommodate it.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2021.

 

In the subject line of your email, include your last name and this course section number: English 136.1 (example: “JOHNSON 136.1”).

 

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN YOUR LAST NAME AND “136.1” IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

 

Acceptance notifications:

Accepted applicants will be notified by email before the first class meeting.

Due to the volume of submissions, the professor is unable to provide feedback or suggestions regarding the students’ submitted work.

 

Creative Writing: Poetry

English 136.2 / Prof. Wilson

Course Description:

English 136 is an intensive poetry workshop, and you’ll write a new poem each week. In class, we’ll discuss your work, the work of fellow students, and other assigned readings. Expect many of the same experiences you’d have in any other writing course: group work, peer critique, revision, and discussion of published work. You’ll also be expected to read and report on the current issue of a literary magazine, write a review of a recent single-author book of poems, and submit a collection of your revised poems at the end of the quarter.

 

How to Apply:

 

Enrollment is by instructor consent. To apply for the course, submit by e-mail attachment three to five of your best poems. In the body of the e-mail, provide your name, major, class level, and a brief note (no more than 250 words) about your experiences with poetry, your favorite poets, and any other creative writing courses you may have taken (none required!). Include your 9-digit UID number. If applying to both poetry workshops, please indicate the one that works best for you.

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2021.

 

The subject line of your message should be your last name followed by the course number (example: Smith 136.2) and it should be sent to rwilson@english.ucla.edu AND creativewriting@english.ucla.edu.

 

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN “136.2” IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

 

Acceptance Notifications:

Accepted students will be notified by email, and a list will be posted in the English Dept. Main Office (Kaplan 149). If admitted, you must attend the first class.

 

Unfortunately, due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students’ submitted work.

 

Creative Writing: Short Story

English 137.1 / Prof. Huneven

Course Description:

 

This class is an intensive workshop on the reading and writing of short literary fiction.

We will consider the short story form, studying one or more great short stories weekly, which the students will take turns presenting to the class. All students will be expected to read these stories multiple times and annotate them to identify the mechanics and the magic.

Students will write one short story every week for the first five weeks. After that, they will write two slightly longer stories and work on revisions. The goals of the class are 1) to help the students develop a regular practice of writing, 2) to foster and train technical skills, and 3) to develop a sound critical faculty.

Emphasis will be on developing the student writer’s individual voice and writing ability

 

How to Apply:

 

Please submit no more than 5 (double-spaced) pages of your fiction and list any workshops you’ve taken in the past. Please list your three favorite short stories and their authors. Also, please tell me your class standing (sophomore, junior, etc.)

 

If you are applying to both workshops and have a preference, please indicate that preference so we can try to accommodate it.

 

Submissions must be e-mailed to huneven@me.com AND creativewriting@english.ucla.edu. When e-mailing submissions, please put your last name and the course and section number in the subject line (example: Henry 137.1)

 

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN “137.1” IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MIGHT NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

 

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE BY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2021

 

Acceptance Notifications

You will be notified if you are accepted before classes begin in January.

 

Due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students’ submitted work.

Creative Writing: Short Story

English 137.2 / Simpson

Course Description:

 

This class is an intensive workshop on the reading and writing of short literary fiction.

We will consider the short story form, studying one or more great short stories weekly, which the students will be expected to read three times and annotate in an effort to grasp its mechanics and magic.

Students will write one (very) short story every other week, based on a prompt the teacher will offer. The goals of the class are 1) to turn every student in the class into a lifelong daily reader 2) to help the students develop a regular practice of writing and 3) to foster and train technical skill. We’ll work on revision and the development of a sound critical faculty. Emphasis will be on developing the student writer’s voice.

 

How To Apply:

 

Please submit no more than 5 (double-spaced) pages of your fiction and list any workshops you’ve taken in the past. Please list your three favorite short stories and their authors. Also, please tell me your class standing (sophomore, junior, etc.)

 

If you are applying to both workshops and have a preference, please indicate that preference.

 

Submissions must be e-mailed to monasimpson@mac.com and creativewriting@english.ucla.edu. When e-mailing submissions, please put your last name and the course and section number in the subject line (example: Jacobs 137.2)

 

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN “137.2” IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

 

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE BY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2021

 

Acceptance Notifications:

 

A class list will be posted in the English Department Office at 149 Kaplan Hall.

 

Unfortunately, due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students’ submitted work.

 

Creative Writing: Memoir and Autobiography

English M138.1 / Prof. Allmendinger

Course Description: 

 

In this seminar, students will write first-person non-fiction narratives relating to their personal lives and experience. Each week, they will submit short pieces for us to read and discuss in class. In addition, we will consider the aesthetics and ethics of first-person writing. Can a person exercise creative license when writing non-fiction? How does one write about oneself objectively, or is it necessary to do so? Do writers have a responsibility to consider other people who appear in their stories? What if they object to being included in your personal narrative or feel misrepresented? Requirements include weekly written assignments, attendance and participation in seminar. Enrollment by instructor consent (PTE).  

 

How to Apply: 

 

Interested students should submit a 250-word personal statement about their writing goals, a list of writing and literature courses taken so far, and a 5-10 page (double spaced) sample of nonfictionwriting. Please submit applications to the instructor’s mailbox in 149 Kaplan Hall or via email: allmendi@humnet.ucla.edu and creativewriting@english.ucla.edu. When e-mailing submissions, please put your last name and MEMOIR & AUTOBIOGRAPHY in the subject line (example: Roberts-MEMOIR & AUTOBIOGRAPHY).  

 

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE BY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2021. 

 

 

This course is an eligible non-fiction topic for the Professional Writing Minor. 

 

 

Creative Writing: Gaming Experiments and Multimedia Scripting

English M138.2 / Prof. Snelson

Course Description: 

 

This creative writing course explores new genres of writing with games. We’ll write games and game writing. And, most importantly, play a variety of games as generators for creative production. We’ll experiment in a wide array of genres and media, including potentially: interactive hypertexts, dating simulators, tabletop (and online) role-playing games, and VR/AR poetics, alongside documentary practices like collecting, journaling, podcasting, machinima, and actual play recording. Studying gaming platforms and histories alongside contemporary art and poetry, we’ll reimagine experimental and multimedia writing practices through a constellation of contemporary approaches to gameplay. Using a collective workshop format, we’ll engage in a series of gaming experiments that attempt to find some of our own creative responses to today’s technological environment. No previous training in games, creative writing, or new media is required.   

  

: : 

  

How To Apply:  

 

Please submit a cover letter introducing yourself and a sample of your writing or creative work in any format (no more than five pages, links to online work in any genre encouraged). In your cover letter, please include the following: your student identification number, email address, year of graduation, and a brief statement that addresses your interest in the course and any relevant coursework, creative practices, or gaming experiences.  

  

Please email your submission in PDF to dsnelson@humnet.ucla.edu and creativewriting@english.ucla.edu. Please title your PDF starting with your last name, i.e.: lastname_winter-gems_submission.pdf. 

  

YOUR APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED BY EMAIL AND MUST CONTAIN “M138.2” IN THE SUBJECT LINE. YOUR SUBMISSION MAY NOT BE READ IF YOU OMIT THIS TAG IN THE SUBJECT LINE. 

  

SUBMISSIONS ARE DUE BY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2021 

  

NOTE: A class list will be posted in English Department Office 

  

Unfortunately, due to the volume of submissions, the professor will be unable to provide feedback or suggestions on the students’ submitted work. 

 

This course is an eligible non-fiction topic for the Professional Writing Minor. 

 

Senior/Capstone Seminars

 

An Early American Disaster

Topics in Colonial American Literature
English 183A / Prof. Fosbury

Shipwrecks. Diseases. Famines. Earthquakes. In many respects, early America was a disaster. In this course, we will investigate how colonizers responded to catastrophe in the literature they wrote. How was disaster imagined and experienced in the 1600s and 1700ss? How did colonizers narrate disaster as part of the colonial project? And how was disaster embraced by the anticolonial and antislavery movements of the period?

 

Enrollment in this seminar will be restricted to American Literature and Culture majors during first pass, and will open up to English majors during second pass.

Philip K. Dick

Topics in 20th and 21st-Century American Literature
English 183C / Prof. North

A study of the fiction of Philip K. Dick and a few of the films derived from it. We will try to determine why a writer who was only a middling success in his lifetime became a major cultural force toward the end of the 20th century. Works considered will include The Man in the High Castle, Ubik, VALIS, “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep,” Minority Report, Blade Runner, and A Scanner Darkly.

 

Enrollment in this seminar will be restricted to American Literature and Culture majors during first pass, and will open up to English majors during second pass.

Ancient Epic to Medieval Romance

Capstone Seminar
English 184.1 / Prof. Jager
ONLINE CLASS; APPLICATION REQUIRED

We will explore how the ancient Mediterranean epic provided the medieval European romance with various character types, narrative patterns, themes and imagery relating to war, eros, justice, spirituality, community and the journey or quest. Texts include Homer’s Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, The Song of Roland, The Lais of Marie de France, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.  Assignments includes weekly reports and a (10-12 pp.) research essay due at the end and also to be adapted for presentation at a tenth-week mini-conference.

 

Admission by PTE: Students interested in the capstone seminar should send a résumé of literature courses taken and a brief (3-5 pp.) writing sample from a previous course (PDFs only)  to <ejager@humnet.ucla.edu>.

Pornography and the Politics of Sexual Representation

Capstone Seminar
English 184.2 / Prof. Mott

For various cultural reasons, sexuality is a particularly sensitive political subject. Indeed, sexual representation remains one of the few cultural forms that is guaranteed to elicit a strong response. Our class will provide students with the research and analytical tools to investigate the causes and effects of those personal and political responses. More specifically, we will use contemporary gender, race, class, and sexuality theories (among others) to help us examine sexual representations in terms of the shaping force they have in our lives. Our examination of a cultural force involves defining key terms, such as “power,” to interrogate how details of key representations manifest their cultural and personal work (effects on people’s values and conditions of existence, for example), on social justice. In other words, students will learn to interpret and explicate representations of sexuality in terms of their manipulation of power. Students will learn to define key terms and interpret cultural representation in an academic dialogue with their peers and with scholars in their field.

 

Dreams, Visions, and Nightmares in Medieval Literature

Capstone Seminar
English 184.3 / Prof. Thomas

Dreams, visions and nightmares are constitutive of medieval literature writ large. They are ubiquitous in hagiographical writings, academic commentaries, theological treatises and poetic compositions. They often inaugurate treatises and tales, raise expectations, fulfill or even frustrate audience expectations. Wherever they occur, they offer a space for thinking through the relations between the real and the visionary, between the historical and the fantastic, between the empirically verifiable and the spiritually valuable, between medieval discourses or disciplines including rhetoric, history, law, and theology. In this course, we will explore dreams, visions and nightmares in texts ranging from the “lives” of holy women and men (such as the semi-autobiographical The Passion of St. Perpetua and Felicity, the anonymous biography of the bride Christina of Markyate, and Eadmer’s Life of Anselm) to the great poetic works of Chaucer (The Parlement of Foules, The House of Fame, The Canterbury Tales), and Langland (Piers Plowman). Our focus will be on the ways in which writers handle dream experiences not just for their content but also their form. We will read fictional compositions framed by dreams, visions and nightmares alongside relevant dream theories/commentaries such as Macrobius’s influential Commentary on the Dream of Scipio, glosses to his commentary and Augustine’s Literal commentary on Genesis.

 

NOT OPEN FOR CREDIT TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED PREVIOUS 184 SEMINARS TITLED “DREAMS, VISIONS, AND APPARITIONS” in 20W/21S.

Women’s Work and Medieval Slavery

Capstone Seminar
English 184.4 / Prof. Fisher

In 2019 the UCLA Library acquired a deed for the sale of a slave woman, Magdalena, from one woman to another in Barcelona in 1401. Identified as a “neophyte” from “Tartary,” Magdalena’s story raises many literary (as well as historical) questions about the past. This course will focus on this primary document, and a series of literary and historical questions that radiate out from it. We will be reading clusters of primary medieval texts that focus on slavery in medieval Europe, on representations of domesticity and gendered medieval labor, on medieval romance depictions of the ‘Tartar’ east, and writing by medieval women. There will be a shorter midterm paper and a final 20 page paper. Students will also make a formal 15 minute presentation on their research project during the second half of the quarter.

 

NOT OPEN FOR CREDIT TO STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ENGLISH 142R WITH SAME TITLE IN WINTER 2020.

Representing Chicanx Life

Topics in Chicanx Literature
English M191B / Prof. Perez-Torres

This class examines literary and cultural texts to consider the various ways that Chicanx thought has engaged issues of representation. The problem of political and cultural representation for Chicanx communities has been a long-standing one. Chicanx activism was driven by a lack of representation and the need to articulate a collective identity so as to achieve social and political equity. The Chicanx writers we study in this class wrestle with a central question: how to represent a Chicanx self in literary texts when that sense of self in a social and historical setting seems constantly under threat? We will consider some of the conditions that make Chicanx and Latinx life feel precarious, and study cultural representation as a politically and socially engaged act of self-definition. We will pursue a careful method of rigorous textual analysis and logical argumentation. The goal is to generate clear, effective analytical thought about the literary and critical texts we read. The goals of the class will be: 1) to express oneself in a clear and organized way; 2) to analyze literary material critically; and, 3) to generate original ideas from a synthesis of different critical thoughts and analyses.

 

Enrollment in this seminar will be restricted to American Literature and Culture majors during first pass, and will open up to English majors during second pass.

Reimagining Asian America in Speculative Fiction

Topics in Asian American Literature
English M191C / Prof. Toy

What will an Asian/American future look like?  This seminar investigates how Asian American artists, filmmakers, and writers have responded to fantasies and fears of Asia—its cultural influence, its economic might, and its military ascendance—by appropriating the conventions of speculative fiction.  We will examine how representations of Asian bodies and landscapes in possible futures or revisionist histories challenge what David Roh, Betsy Huang, and Greta Niu call techno-orientalism—problematic visions of Asia as simultaneously hypo- and hyper-technological.  Primary texts may include works by Ted Chiang (“Story of Your Life”), Destin Daniel Cretton (Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings), Larissa Lai (“Rachel”), Chang-rae Lee (On Such a Full Sea), Marjorie Liu (Monstress), Ruth Ozeki (A Tale for the Time Being), Karen Tei Yamashita (Through the Arc of the Rainforest), and Charles Yu (Interior Chinatown).

 

Enrollment in this seminar will be restricted to American Literature and Culture majors during first pass, and will open up to English majors during second pass.