CoursesCourses for the American Literature & Culture Major

The Department of English offers a wide variety of courses at the general and advanced levels. Courses are divided into the following sections:

0-99 Lower Division Courses (Freshman, Sophomore)
100-199
Upper Division Courses (Junior, Senior)
200 & above
Graduate Courses

Fall 2021

Lower Division Courses in English (Freshman, Sophomore)

Please note that these courses are intended as preparation for the major in American Literature and Culture. Limited space may be available for students wishing to take these courses for GE or Diversity credit.

Introduction to American Cultures

English 11 / Prof. Silva

This course is a gateway to the American Literature and Culture major. In a time when ideas of American exceptionalism, supremacy, and justice are as contested as they have ever been, our goal will be to examine what “America” and what the “United States” mean in national, hemispheric, and global contexts. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we will consider the literary and cultural currents that shaped how those terms were used over five centuries of colonial history and how they continue to shape literary and cultural studies. The key terms that will shape our discussions are origins (the making of a colony; the making of a nation; the making of culture), identities (the relation between individual, community, and culture), and media (how we access the past and how we narrate for the future).

 

This course fulfills a preparatory requirement for the American Literature and Culture major.

Topics in American Culture: Fever!

English 87 / Prof. Looby

In light of our COVID-19 pandemic we will focus on a famous earlier public health emergency, the Philadelphia Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793. Over the summer and fall of that year, roughly a tenth of the population of the city—then the nation’s capital—perished from what we now know to be a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes, but which was then thought to be caused either by putrid vapors or physical contact. The epidemic produced journalism, medical treatises, poems, novels (Charles Brockden Brown’s Arthur Mervyn notably), and one of the most important early Black political publications, a defense of the African American community after it had been publicly slandered. The epidemic has recently been revisited by contemporary writers including John Edgar Wideman (The Cattle Killing) and Laurie Halse Anderson (the young adult novel Fever 1793). We will examine this event and its textual archive from the perspectives of literary study and cultural history, and also using methods from the medical humanities, urban humanities, and critical race theory.

 

This course will be reserved for American Literature and Culture majors on first pass and during summer orientation. Non-majors hoping to take the course for GE or Diversity credit may enroll after September 14.

 

Upper Division Writing, Research, and Practicum Opportunities

Please note that these courses do not satisfy any ALC major requirements; however, they are valuable opportunities for upper-division credit that ALC students may wish to explore.

Writing in the English Major: Analytical Writing

English 110A.1 / Prof. Stephan

In this course, designed specifically for English majors but now open to students from all majors for the first time, you will learn to build on your skills and abilities as a writer of literary and cultural analyses. You’ll find ways to ask richer literary questions, develop more nuanced analyses of complex texts, and shape your own voice as a writer. We’ll focus on literary arguments and begin with this basic question: what constitutes a good, rich, complex question in literary analysis? What makes a substantial topic that might lead to a top-notch persuasive argument? Because good writing (and thus good argumentation) is also a process, we will practice creation, revision, contemplation, and editing, as well as seeking and giving feedback. Throughout the course, we will workshop writing exercises with the goal of making ourselves and others more comfortable and more successful as writers of good academic prose.

 

This course counts as an elective for the Professional Writing Minor. 

Writing in the English Major: Analytical Writing

English 110A.2 / Prof. Bistline

In this writing-intensive course, you will build on and hone your skills as a writer of sophisticated literary and cultural analyses. This class will focus on demystifying the process of creating compelling, complex arguments about literary texts. You will learn how to ask richer literary questions, make more nuanced arguments, and develop your voice as an academic writer. We will investigate what constitutes a good, rich literary analysis by exploring questions central to the writing process: What topics lead to top-notch, persuasive arguments? How do successful essays creatively attend to and expand on the conventions of the traditional literary analysis? What strategies do effective writers use as they draft and revise their essays? This class emphasizes that writing well and arguing persuasively depend on a process of creative thinking, drafting, and revising, as well as seeking and giving feedback. This class will foster a supportive classroom community in which we regularly discuss and workshop writing exercises. We will aim to make you more comfortable with the conventions of advanced literary analysis, more skillful and effective in your writing process, and more empowered to use your voice to make successful arguments.

 

This course counts as an elective for the Professional Writing Minor. 

Careers in Humanities

English M191P / Prof. Macfadyen

Challenges misassumptions regarding humanities majors and their practical applications to life after graduation. Exploration of wide range of careers, with hands-on practice in crafting professional narrative. Guest lectures from UCLA professionals and alumni—all experts in career planning and local industry. Students engage with workplace leaders, and simultaneously build professional dossier—on paper or online—in preparation for life after UCLA with a humanities degree.

 

This course counts as an elective for the Professional Writing Minor. 

Westwind Journal

Undergraduate Practicum in English
English M192.1 / Prof. Wilson

This course is for the staff of Westwind, UCLA’s Journal for the Arts. If you are interested in joining the Westwind staff, please familiarize yourself with the journal at www.westwind.ucla.edu, and plan to attend the first Fall meeting.

UCLAPoem

Undergraduate Practicum in English
English M192.2 / Prof. Wilson

This course is for students in UCLAPoem (https://www.instagram.com/uclapoem/).  If you’re interested in reading and discussing published poetry, and in helping to plan and organize public poetry events and activities throughout the year, come to the first Fall meeting!

 

Upper Division Courses in English

Courses that meet the American Literature and Culture major requirement for pre-1848 material are marked with an asterisk.

ORIGINS – Beginnings, Events, and Trajectories

The Intimacy of Queer Life in Early Queer Literature

Queer Literatures and Cultures, 1850 to 1970
English M101B / Prof. Little

From the elegiac and tragic to the comic, this course begins with Walt Whitman and ends (most likely) with lesbian pulp fiction. The course surveys not only some of the most groundbreaking queer texts—novels, poems, plays (sometimes in the form of film)—written between 1860 and the late 1960s but also the intriguing personalities/authors behind so many of them.  Our course attends to how this literature and these personages resisted systemic efforts to disappear, silence, and erase queer bodies, voices, and subjectivities. Without resorting to autobiography (at least in any straightforward sense), the queer literature produced during this period makes emphatically evident the intimate relationship between life and narrative: importantly, literature in this era was far less a way of reporting on one’s life than a way of laying claim to one. Queer literature was indeed a way to demonstrate and perform the fact that queer folk, like non-queer folk, had intimate lives. This course serves as a literary and cultural introduction to the period under consideration as well as to some of the ideas that have come to shape our own contemporary queer epistemologies and sensibilities.

 

Not open to students who took English M101B, LGBTS M101B, or Gender Studies M105B in Fall 2018, 2019, or 2020.

Historical Survey of Asian American Literature

English M102A / Prof. Toy

Survey of Asian American literature either produced from or thematically reflecting pre-1980 period. Issues include immigration, diaspora, generational conflict, appropriation of cultural traditions, ethnic/gender formation, interethnic dynamics, and social movement.

Early African American Literature

English M104A / Prof. Yarborough

Survey of African American literature from the 18th century to World War I, including oral and written forms (folktales, spirituals, sermons; fiction, autobiography, poetry). Authors covered include Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Charles Chesnutt, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The class will focus on the historical and cultural contexts of the literary works as well as on diverse strategies for engaging formal aspects of the assigned materials. Requirements include attendance and participation in section, a midterm exam, a term paper, and a final exam.

Colonial Beginnings of American Literature**

English 166A / Prof. Silva

This course is a survey of colonial American literatures and cultures. Although most of the texts on the syllabus were written in colonies that would eventually become part of the United States, the course itself is not meant to be a literary history of the US. Instead, we will consider these materials in the full diversity of local, regional, and Atlantic contexts that framed the colonial experiences they describe for a range of peoples and nations. It is a fundamental precept of the course that this diversity defined the New World, and that scholars cannot hope to understand the literary history of the Americas in any meaningful way without learning to look for, to recognize, and to read beyond the narrow band of voices that have previously defined the national canon. Our investigations will test the conceptual limits of categories like indigeneity, exploration, captivity, enlightenment, and slavery as we trace their roles in shaping the modern vocabulary and grammar of community and nation in the Americas.

 

**Qualifies as a pre-1848 course for American Literature and Culture majors

American Literature, 1832 to 1865

English 166C / Prof. Colacurcio

Historical survey of American literatures from Jacksonian era to end of Civil War, including emergent tradition of American Romanticism, augmented and challenged by genres of popular protest urging application of democratic ideals to questions of race, gender, and social equality

 American Literature, 1865 to 1900

English 170A / Prof. Looby

After the Civil War American literature entered a period of ferment. In this course we will study American literary expression after the war and up to the beginning of the twentieth century, tracing lines of development as it underwent radical changes. We’ll begin by reading De Forest’s Civil War novel, Miss Ravenel’s Conversion. At the center of the course will be a sustained reading of a cluster of writers who, in the mid-1880s, participated in a collective literary undertaking sponsored by the popular Century Magazine, an effort to review the war itself and unify the nation in its aftermath. James serialized The Bostonians there; Howells’s The Rise of Silas Lapham too; excerpts from Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as well. African American writer Charles Chesnutt tried to contribute to the Century at this time but was rebuffed: we will read him, too. Women writers of various stripes—sentimental and conventional, caustic and rebellious—came to the fore in this period: we will read Chopin’s The Awakening and Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs.

IDENTITIES – Places, Communities, and Environments

The Intimacy of Queer Life in Early Queer Literature

Queer Literatures and Cultures, 1850 to 1970
English M101B / Prof. Little

From the elegiac and tragic to the comic, this course begins with Walt Whitman and ends (most likely) with lesbian pulp fiction. The course surveys not only some of the most groundbreaking queer texts—novels, poems, plays (sometimes in the form of film)—written between 1860 and the late 1960s but also the intriguing personalities/authors behind so many of them.  Our course attends to how this literature and these personages resisted systemic efforts to disappear, silence, and erase queer bodies, voices, and subjectivities. Without resorting to autobiography (at least in any straightforward sense), the queer literature produced during this period makes emphatically evident the intimate relationship between life and narrative: importantly, literature in this era was far less a way of reporting on one’s life than a way of laying claim to one. Queer literature was indeed a way to demonstrate and perform the fact that queer folk, like non-queer folk, had intimate lives. This course serves as a literary and cultural introduction to the period under consideration as well as to some of the ideas that have come to shape our own contemporary queer epistemologies and sensibilities.

 

Not open to students who took English M101B, LGBTS M101B, or Gender Studies M105B in Fall 2018, 2019, or 2020.

Historical Survey of Asian American Literature

English M102A / Prof. Toy

Survey of Asian American literature either produced from or thematically reflecting pre-1980 period. Issues include immigration, diaspora, generational conflict, appropriation of cultural traditions, ethnic/gender formation, interethnic dynamics, and social movement.

Early African American Literature

English M104A / Prof. Yarborough

Survey of African American literature from the 18th century to World War I, including oral and written forms (folktales, spirituals, sermons; fiction, autobiography, poetry). Authors covered include Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Charles Chesnutt, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The class will focus on the historical and cultural contexts of the literary works as well as on diverse strategies for engaging formal aspects of the assigned materials. Requirements include attendance and participation in section, a midterm exam, a term paper, and a final exam.

Chicana/o/x Literature since el Movimiento, 1970s to Present

ONLINE COURSE
English M105C / Prof. Perez-Torres

This class surveys Chicanx literature from the 1960’s onward to examine the various meanings (social, sexual, racial, ethnic, cultural, political, economic) evoked by the term Chicanx. We’ll use this term because it complicates a simple binary gender identification. The class analyzes literary texts as cultural expressions of lived Chicanx experiences. These experiences are one legacy of global European expansion beginning in the 15th century. Our focus will be the thematic and formal ways that Chicanx literature engages this legacy: social inequalities, collective political action, oppositional consciousness, gender and sexual identification, class consciousness, aesthetic production, and racial stratification. The goals of the class will be: 1) to express oneself in a clear and organized way; 2) to analyze literary material critically; 3) to generate original ideas by synthesizing different critical thoughts and analyses; 4) to learn about Chicanx life and culture.

Interiors: Women of Color Writing the Self

Studies in Women’s Writing
English M107A / Prof. S.K. Lee

Feminist writers and scholars have been attuned to psychic and domestic interiors as fraught, feminized sites of the home, family, tradition, privacy, intimacy, and property. This course examines how the interior and all that it implies as a gendered and racialized space, metaphor, and theme, is inhabited by women of color writers confronted with the imperatives to make oneself and one’s identity public, knowable, transparent, and accessible. Questions that will ground our discussion are: How do women of color experiment with the conventions of memoir and autobiography to narrate and imagine their interior life? How does an attunement to interiority – to one’s inner worlds – become the means of representing and giving an account of oneself? What forms of consolation, protection, and creativity can interiority provide? The course engages with literary works as well as queer and feminist theory to examine the ways that women of color have written the self by turning toward interiority, as the inscrutable, partially hidden, quiet, and opaque.

Re/writing Mexican LA

Literature of California and the American West
English 117 / Prof. Lopez

This class explores the role literature played in California’s 19th century shift from a Mexican territory to a US state.  That transformation relies on erasing the state’s Mexican past and replacing it with a Spanish fantasy, a process we’ll explore using LA as a case study. Through an intersectional analysis of the 19th c Latinx, indigenous, and Anglo literature of the southland, students will examine the precise ways in which a dominant majority can mobilize narrative – and the study of literature – to silence and disempower.  We will also investigate resistance strategies. Students will be expected to engage in rigorous textual analysis, work with archival material, and produce – in addition to a traditional paper – creative, publicly engaged writing across multiple platforms including the Instagram project @picturingmexicanamerica.  Readings will be in English and multigeneric, encompassing oral histories, plays, poetry, and prose fiction.

What Was America?

Literature of the Americas
English 135 / Prof. Fosbury

America was not discovered. It was invented. America is as much an idea or an art project as it is a place or a polity. In this course, we will investigate the many meanings of America in literary history. We will start with the first contacts between Indigenous peoples and European colonizers in the early modern era, and we will end when the United States begins to monopolize the term in the nineteenth century. Our studies will take us between North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean as we investigate how empire, colonialism, slavery, transnational dynamics, and cross-cultural transformations among indigenous, European, and African civilizations impacted the history of “America.” Together, we will question how America was invented, and often contested, in literary forms and genres that range from colonial records and natural histories to poems and novels. In these ways of writing about America, what did the place and term mean to different people at different times in the past? What was America then, and how does it help us understand what it is today?

Major American Writers

English 168 / Prof. M. Gallagher

This course will consider the works of some of the major writers of the United States, from its colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Among the topics of discussion will be how American literature reflects and accounts for what it means to be “American,” with particular emphasis on constructions of identity, across a number of genres—poetry, autobiography, narratives, and novels. Readings will include works by Anne Bradstreet, Hannah Webster Foster, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Jacobs, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, and Emily Dickinson.

American Literature, 1900 to 1945

English 170B / Prof. Huehls

This class examines modernism in its many forms and permutations. We will focus in particular on the interaction between aesthetics and politics, closely examining the relationship between innovative literary forms and pressing political concerns of the first half of the twentieth century. Authors include James, Stein, Cather, Toomer, Eliot, and Larsen.

Contemporary American Poetry: Useful Poetry

English 173C / Prof. Wilson

Reading and discussion of diverse established and emerging American poets, including the most recent United States Poets Laureate: Joy Harjo, Tracy K. Smith, and Juan Felipe Herrera.  Emphasis on how poems by living American poets help us go on, even (and especially) in difficult times.

The Evolution of Anti-racism in Nonfiction Prose and Documentary Film

American Nonfictional Prose
English 175 / Prof. Solomon

This course will highlight the significant contribution made by writers, visual artists, and filmmakers to the on-going project of anti-racism in U.S. culture. We will trace the development of anti-racist arguments from the late 19th century to the present, examining important essays, speeches, manifestos, exposés, graphic novels, and documentary films that were produced with the explicit intent of challenging the status quo, redefinining notions of community, and – ultimately – bringing about a more perfect union.

Culture and Social Change from Joe McCarthy to Ronald Reagan

Interdisciplinary Studies in American Culture
English 177 / Prof. Perez-Torres

This course studies different aspects of U.S. culture from the 1950’s to the 1980’s through the lens of literature produced during a period of significant turmoil and crisis. Historically, this period is framed by two figures sometimes considered emblematic of a certain repressive American character: Senator Joseph McCarthy and President Ronald Reagan. We will look at the relationship between literature, culture, and the social conditions that shape and are shaped by particular cultural objects and forces. While the focus will be on literature, we will approach the literary as one manifestation of cultural expression. We will us analytical tools to “read” a variety of cultural texts (literary, musical, artistic, performative) to consider their various meanings and significances. A large part of the class will involve participation — presentations, discussions, group work — and so attendance in the class is mandatory. The learning experience will depend on everyone’s participation, so be prepared to engage in class. The goals of the class will be: 1) to express oneself in a clear and organized way; 2) to analyze cultural material critically; 3) to generate original ideas by synthesizing different critical thoughts and analyses; 4) to learn about US life and culture.

MEDIA – Aesthetics, Genres, and Technologies

 

COURSE CANCELLED Science Fiction

English 115E / Prof. Kern

Course cancelled.

Major American Writers

English 168 / Prof. M. Gallagher

This course will consider the works of some of the major writers of the United States, from its colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Among the topics of discussion will be how American literature reflects and accounts for what it means to be “American,” with particular emphasis on constructions of identity, across a number of genres—poetry, autobiography, narratives, and novels. Readings will include works by Anne Bradstreet, Hannah Webster Foster, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Jacobs, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, and Emily Dickinson.

American Literature, 1865 to 1900

English 170A / Prof. Looby

After the Civil War American literature entered a period of ferment. In this course we will study American literary expression after the war and up to the beginning of the twentieth century, tracing lines of development as it underwent radical changes. We’ll begin by reading De Forest’s Civil War novel, Miss Ravenel’s Conversion. At the center of the course will be a sustained reading of a cluster of writers who, in the mid-1880s, participated in a collective literary undertaking sponsored by the popular Century Magazine, an effort to review the war itself and unify the nation in its aftermath. James serialized The Bostonians there; Howells’s The Rise of Silas Lapham too; excerpts from Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as well. African American writer Charles Chesnutt tried to contribute to the Century at this time but was rebuffed: we will read him, too. Women writers of various stripes—sentimental and conventional, caustic and rebellious—came to the fore in this period: we will read Chopin’s The Awakening and Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs.

American Literature, 1900 to 1945

English 170B / Prof. Huehls

This class examines modernism in its many forms and permutations. We will focus in particular on the interaction between aesthetics and politics, closely examining the relationship between innovative literary forms and pressing political concerns of the first half of the twentieth century. Authors include James, Stein, Cather, Toomer, Eliot, and Larsen.

Contemporary American Poetry: Useful Poetry

English 173C / Prof. Wilson

Reading and discussion of diverse established and emerging American poets, including the most recent United States Poets Laureate: Joy Harjo, Tracy K. Smith, and Juan Felipe Herrera.  Emphasis on how poems by living American poets help us go on, even (and especially) in difficult times.

The Evolution of Anti-racism in Nonfiction Prose and Documentary Film

American Nonfictional Prose
English 175 / Prof. Solomon

This course will highlight the significant contribution made by writers, visual artists, and filmmakers to the on-going project of anti-racism in U.S. culture. We will trace the development of anti-racist arguments from the late 19th century to the present, examining important essays, speeches, manifestos, exposés, graphic novels, and documentary films that were produced with the explicit intent of challenging the status quo, redefinining notions of community, and – ultimately – bringing about a more perfect union.

Culture and Social Change from Joe McCarthy to Ronald Reagan

Interdisciplinary Studies in American Culture
English 177 / Prof. Perez-Torres

This course studies different aspects of U.S. culture from the 1950’s to the 1980’s through the lens of literature produced during a period of significant turmoil and crisis. Historically, this period is framed by two figures sometimes considered emblematic of a certain repressive American character: Senator Joseph McCarthy and President Ronald Reagan. We will look at the relationship between literature, culture, and the social conditions that shape and are shaped by particular cultural objects and forces. While the focus will be on literature, we will approach the literary as one manifestation of cultural expression. We will us analytical tools to “read” a variety of cultural texts (literary, musical, artistic, performative) to consider their various meanings and significances. A large part of the class will involve participation — presentations, discussions, group work — and so attendance in the class is mandatory. The learning experience will depend on everyone’s participation, so be prepared to engage in class. The goals of the class will be: 1) to express oneself in a clear and organized way; 2) to analyze cultural material critically; 3) to generate original ideas by synthesizing different critical thoughts and analyses; 4) to learn about US life and culture.

 

Senior/Capstone Seminars

Transcendentalism

Topics in 19th Century American Literature
English 183B / Prof. M. Gallagher

This course will focus on the literary, religious, social, and political movement that was Transcendentalism, with emphasis on the three major writers—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Henry David Thoreau. Between the 1830s and 1850s, the Transcendentalist movement exerted its influence over New England, toward the western frontier, and across the Atlantic, manifesting itself in utopian experiments, abolitionist activities, and a new school of literature. What began with a “religious demonstration” in Boston and at Harvard quickly expanded to include all manner of “new views”: on religious and spiritual life; on the individual and society; on human rights; and on nature and the natural world. We will consider the many forms that Transcendentalism takes—sermons, speeches, journals, letters, essays, reviews, narratives, and poetry—and will determine what they have to say about nature, spirit, and the self.

 

Reserved for American Literature & Culture majors on first pass. Open to English majors on second pass.

Immigrant Stories: Literary and Cinematic

Topics in 20th and 21st Century American Literature
English 183C.1 / Prof. Decker

This course examines literary and cinematic representations of the American immigrant experience over the last century. To live between cultures, to experience the confounding processes of racialization and assimilation, to labor to translate one’s deepest interiority into a foreign language––all these aspects of migration make a new imaginative relationship with the world a necessity for the migrant and, as such, are fertile ground for literary exploration and cinematic expression. In this class, we study novels and movies as distinct mediums even as we attend to their affinities, such as an impulse toward narrative storytelling. Among our films, one is from the silent era (Chaplin’s The Immigrant); among our novels, one is a wordless story of sequenced, illustrated panels (Tan’s The Arrival). Other novels include Eugenides’ Middlesex, Ozeki’s A Tale for a Time Being, Herrera’s Signs Preceding the End of the World. Other movies: Coppola’s The Godfather, Nair’s The Namesake, Fukunaga’s Sin Nombre.

 

Reserved for American Literature & Culture majors on first pass. Open to English majors on second pass.

Literature of the Beat Generation

Topics in 20th and 21st Century American Literature
English 183C.2 / Prof. Dickey

This course will explore the Beat phenomenon in its historical and cultural moment and will locate Beat literature in the tradition of American Romantic writing. We will concentrate on works by William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Jack Kerouac, paying attention to other figures like Neal Cassady, Gregory Corso, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti, whose lives and works in some way confront and contest the pedestrian values of 1950s America (and after). We will also investigate the aesthetic principles that the Beats appropriated from diverse modernist and contemporary sources – Dada and Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Bebop – in order to ratify their own contrivances of spontaneity. And finally, we will consider predecessors (e.g. James Fenimore Cooper, Walt Whitman, Henry Miller) and inheritors (e.g., Ken Kesey, Sam Shepard, Hunter S. Thompson) whose works illuminate the achievement, or fried shoes, of the Beats.

 

Reserved for American Literature & Culture majors on first pass. Open to English majors on second pass.

Narrating the 1960s: Creative Nonfiction in an Age of Electronic Media

Capstone Seminar
English 184.1 / Prof. Decker

This course examines the 1960’s literary movement called New Journalism and the culture that gave rise to it. We read the most celebrated New Journalists––Joan Didion, Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, and Hunter Thompson––to consider how they use their talents as non-fiction novelists to respond to upheavals in mass media and society at large. We address the following kinds of questions. How can an older (print) form like the novel compete for the attention of consumers within a new mediascape brought about by the proliferation of film and TV? Is the New Journalist’s non-fiction narrative mode up to the task of representing a reality––political assassinations, urban riots, Black and Chicano protests, psychedelic drugs, moon walks, Vietnam War, Watergate, women’s liberation––that threatens to outstrip the writer’s imagination? Readings include: The White Album, Radical Chic, Dispatches, Strange Rumblings in Aztlan. Documentary films: Rush to Judgment, Black Panther, Medium Cool, Hearts and Minds. Plus TV news coverage from the era.

 

Reserved for American Literature & Culture majors only on first pass. Open to English majors on second pass.

The Feminist Classroom: Gender, Knowledge, and Pedagogy

Capstone Seminar
English 184.2 / Prof. S.K. Lee

Feminist theory is often encountered in the classroom: on the syllabus, in lectures, seminars, and discussions between teachers and students. The classroom, then, is a crucial site for feminist theory, as the space where it is taught and learned, but also as the site of feminist theorizations of teaching and learning. This seminar focuses on feminist theory that critically reflects on not only what is taught and learned in the feminist classroom, but how one teaches and learns, both in the feminist classroom and outside of it. Central questions that will frame our discussion are: How is knowledge produced and transmitted in the feminist classroom? How does the personal and lived experience constitute knowledge and ways of knowing? What are the gendered power dynamics in the classroom and how do they shape feminist pedagogies that move beyond the classroom? This seminar engages with novels and feminist theories centered around the classroom as the site for creating feminist methods, practices, and styles of teaching, learning, communication, and expression.

 

Reserved for American Literature & Culture majors on first pass. Open to English majors on second pass.

Topics in African American Literature

English M191A / Prof. Streeter

Variable specialized studies course in African American literature. Detailed description to be posted soon.

 

Reserved for American Literature & Culture majors on first pass. Open to English majors on second pass.